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elchanite 




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elchanite 




MOST pronounced of the many 
changes we have experienced 
have been those of a physical nature. 
While we have grown in stature there 
has been a corresponding change in the 
size of our school. This change was ac- 
complished by our movement to a more 
spacious building at the corner of 
Church and Bedford Avenues. In place 
of our former cramped quarters we now 
have large classrooms, airy corridors, 
and a school yard in back. This pre- 



sents an atmosphere which is in every 
respect more conducive to clear think- 
ing and healthful living. 




And he shall be like a tree planted by streams of water 
that bringeth forth its fruit in its season . . . Psalms 1 : 3 





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*•••. »»0t 



June 1957 



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ADMINISTRATION 5 

ELCHANITE STAFF 6 

TALMUD FACULTY 8 

HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY 10 

SENIORS 17 

Graduates 18 

Diary 34 

Honors . 42 

ACTIVITIES 43 

G.0 44 

Student Court 47 

Service Squad 48 

Variety Night 50 

Y.O.C 52 

Kolenu 53 

Topics 54 

Bulletin 55 

Library 56 

Arista 58 

Debating 60 

Varsity Basketball 62 

Junior Varsity Basketball 64 

Intramurals 65 

Budding Sports 66 

Co-op Store 68 

LITERATURE 69 

Fame — By Perry Kravit 70 

In Quest of Peace — By Sheldon Weiser 71 

Growth and Accomplishment — By Joseph Lifschitz . . 72 

This Piece of Clay — By Isaac Cantor 74 

For Sale — By Harvey Kuritzky 75 

Holy to a Billion People — By Raphael Bloch .... 76 

The Last Act — By Mark Press 78 

On Death— By Paul Stein 79 

C.O.D. — By Harvey Mandel 80 

ADVERTISEMENTS 81 

SENIOR DIRECTORY 127 




Dr. Samuel Belkin, President 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY 




Dr. Shelley R. Saphire, Supervisor, 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOLS 



Rabbi Abraham N. Zuroff, Principal, and 
Mr. Samuel Levine, Director 



Rabbi Zuroff and Mr. Levine, Principal and Executive Director 
respectively, are well known to all students of Y.U.H.S.B. With 
the school since its inception, they, more than anyone else, are re- 
sponsible for our growth and progress. Ever ready to guide and 
advise, though not directly connected with Y.U.H.S.B., are Dr. 
Belkin, President of Y.U., and Dr. Saphire, Supervisor of Y.U. 
High Schools. 






Staff... 



Joshua Levy, Editor-in-Chief Mark Press, Editor-in-Chief 




Alan Balsam, Co-Editor 




Lejt to right: Art Editor M. Lebowitz, Co-Editor A. Fruchter, Editor-in-Chief 
J. Levy, Faculty Adviser H. Allan, L. Greenfield, Art Editor N. Finkiel, 
W. Enker, N. Nusbacher 



GROWTH has been the keynote of the Elchanite 
throughout the years of its existence. Each 
edition has been better than the one before. 

From copy preparation to final printing, much 
eflEort and cooperation are required. The Business 
Managers who secure advertisements, the Activi- 
ties Editors who organize the writeups for each stu- 
dent and activity, the Photography Staff which takes 
the candid pictures of school life, and the Art Edi- 
tors who are in charge of illustrating the book all 
must work together under the Editors-in-Chief in 

1 




order to produce an award-winning yearbook. The 
Elchanite is the product of the hard work and de- 
voted efforts of all of them. 

Undergraduate assistance is also of vital impor- 
tance in publishing a successful yearbook. Many 
articles, sketches, and drawings submitted by lower- 
termers are included, and they are also assuming an 
ever-increasing share of the financial burden. 

We would like to express our sincerest apprecia- 
tion to Mr. Harry Allan, faculty adviser, for his in- 
valuable service to our yearbook. 



1 . Sheldon Weiser, Photography Editor 

2. Morris Zauderer, Photography Editor 

3. Jacob Tesler, Photography Editor 

4. Jack Ness, Activities Editor 

5. Frederick Nathan, Activities Editor 

6. Ira Kellman, Activities Editor 

7. Morton Leibowitz, Activities Editor 

8. Moses GeSen, Typing Editor 

9. Jack Fein, Typing Editor 

10. Myron Zinaman, Business Manager 

1 1 . Michael Ostrow, Business Manager 

12. Philip Bursky, Business Manager 

13. Uriel Gottesman, Business Manager 

14. Harvey Mandel, Literary Editor 

1 5 . Alan Hyman, L iterary Editor 

16. Nathan Finkiel, Art Editor 

17. Martin Lebowitz, Art Editor 



FACULTY 

talmud 




Rabbi Solomon Drillman 




^^ »! 





Rabbi Peretz Yogel. Talmud Examiner 

OUR Talmud faculty is characteristic of the high standards of the 
Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, of which we are a 
part. Aside from the respect our rabbis command as scholars, many 
are leaders of Orthodox Jewry in their own communities and give 
freely of their time and effort to encourage learning and religious ob- 
servance. 




Rabbi Wolf Durchin 



The goal of every student is to reach the Talmud class of Rabhi P. Yogel, shown above 
in session. 





Rabbi Joseph Epstein 



Rabbi Samuel Faivushevitz Rabbi Herman Frankel 





Rabbi Morris Gordon 



1^ 




Rabbi Harold B. Kanotopsky 




Rabbi Zelo Schussheim 





> Rabbi Meyer Karlin 



Our morning session is devoted mainly to the teaching of Talmud, 
with the curriculum being enriched by instruction in Bible, Prophets, 
and Jewish law. Unlike the secular department, the students are grouped 
according to proficiency rather than years, a method which allows each 
student to learn at his own pace. The entire system is coordinated by 
the Talmud examiner. Rabbi Peretz Yogel. 



M. Zauderer, M. Press, and 
L. Greenfield seek the answer 
to their rabbi's last question. 





Rabbi Pincus Shebshaievitz 



Rabbi Samuel Shmidman 




THROUGH the joint efforts of the entire staff, the English 
Department has succeeded in making its course one of 
the best-liked in the program of studies. In addition to their 
adeptness at teaching, several members of the department have 
taken upon themselves extra duties as advisers to student ac- 
tivities and publications. Incorporating into the curriculum 
courses in English and American literature, scholarship prepa- 
ration, and intensive instruction in grammar, they are largely 
responsible for the remarkable success our students have 
achieved on the Regents' Scholarship Examinations. 



Mr. Joseph B. Strum 



english 




Mr. Robert E. Bassell 




^.^^^iS^ ^1j 




Mr. Sidney Gold 



Mr. Jacob D. Godin 



10 



Mr. Samuel Gallant ., -v*,^- 





Dr. Max Horwitz 



languages 




Dr. Jechiel Lichtenstein 




Mr. Jacob Soshuk 



' ' ' LM 



FOREIGN languages are widely studied in our school, each 
student being required to take four years of Hebrew and two 
years of either French or Spanish. 

In the past year Rabbi Perlman and Mr. Brender left our 
Yeshiva and Dr. Minkowich was added to the staff. The faculty 
as it now stands will undoubtedly continue the excellent work 
the department has been doing up to this time. 





Mr. Isaac Cantor 



Mr. Ben Brender 



Dr. Meyer Minkowich 



Rabbi Harold B. Perlman 




mathematics 




Mr. Morris Turetsky 



^^^^ 



THE varied methods and techniques employed by 
our mathematics teachers have instilled in our 
students an avid interest in these subjects. Our in- 
structors are drawn from several fine schools, bring- 
ing with them abilities which can only be gained 
from years of experience. 

In the past year our Mathematics Department 
substituted tenth year mathematics for the custom- 
ary plane geometry. This is an example of their con- 
stant efforts to improve the caliber of the program 
of studies. 




Mr. Israel Wallach 




Mr. Harry Goldstein 




Mr. Morris Septimus 




12 



science 





Mr. Samuel Lebowitz 



Mr. Julius Landowne 





Mr. Theodore Kallner 



Mr. George Davidson 




fer 

Mr. David Schiff 



OUR science faculty has seen 
more shifting of personnel 
than any other department, but 
throughout this period of transition 
it has maintained its high standards. 
When we entered the school the staff 
consisted of Messrs. Kallner, Lan- 
downe, and Lebowitz; now, after 
four years, the first two have been 
replaced by Messrs. Shiff and 
Davidson. 

General science, biology, chem- 
istry, and physics are the four 
sciences offered. Of these the first 
two are required, the second two 
optional. The science laboratory is 
used by all classes and practical ex- 
periments increase interest in the 
courses. 




Not relying on texts alone. J. Tesler and M. Press 
learn from personal experience in our laboratory. 



13 



social studies 





Mr. Martin Lilker 



Mr. Isidore Melov 

THOUGH taught by one of our smallest staffs, 
social studies occupies a very prominent place 
in the curriculum. Mr. Lilker, who teaches Ameri- 
can and world history to the junior and senior 
classes, is well known and liked by all. In our 
senior year, Mr. Melov, who formerly taught 
geography and economics, left us to write a book 
and was replaced by Mr. Purcell. In the short time 
we have had him he has become part of our school 
and adds to the popularity of his department. 





ART, music, and physical education, each given 
*» for two years, are the minor subjects in our 
curriculum. In art we learn the fundamentals of de- 
sign, color, and the history of the subject, while 
music stresses appreciation of classical pieces. The 
physical education program enables each student to 
receive the exercise vital to good health. 



art 



Mr. Harry Allan 



phi^sical education 






Mr. Harry Morse 



music 



Mr. Leon Leibowitz 



guidance 



A RECENT innovation in our school, the Guidance Depart- 
ment has proven of great value to the student body. Under 
the capable direction of Mr. Martin Lilker, it has aided many 
students in the solution of their academic and personal prob- 
lems. We hope that in the future this vital and necessary service 
will be expanded and improved even further. 

M. Zauderer and A. Hyman seek advice from Mr. Lilker. 
guidance counselor, on one of the many problems which 
accompany graduation. 




officers 





Mrs. Yetta Rosenman, Secretary 



Mrs. Helen Shalam, Secretary, Mr. J. Blazer, Corresponding Secretary 

S. Schiff, student assistant 

MRS. Yetta Rosenman, Secretary to the Principal, entered the school in our 
sophomore year and since that time has proven herself a friend who takes 
an active interest in all the students. This popularity was achieved despite the 
fact that one of her duties is the distribution of "admits." Mrs. Helen Shalam, \\ 
Secretary, Mr. J. Blazer, Corresponding Secretary, and S. Schiff, student 
assistant, do a commendable job running the executive office. 





maintenance 



AIDED by a staff of three, Mr. John Santiago does an excel- 
' lent job of maintaining the physical appearance and 
cleanliness of the building. In addition to his other duties, he 
runs a food concession for the convenience of the students. 
Known throughout the school as "John," he has succeeded in 
establishing personal contact with both students and faculty 
ahke. 



Mr. John Santiago, Chief Custodian 



16 




SENIORS 



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17 





BERNARD ABLER 

Arista 5-8; Student Court 8; Class President 
4, Vice-President 5-8, Debating Manager 7, 
Debating Team 1-8, Business Mgr. 3; Service 
Squad 2-4, Captain 7; English Library 6; 
Topics Business Staff 4, Circulation Mgr. 8; 
Tennis Team 6-8, Captain 7-8; Glee Club 3-5. 

Active in all aspects of our extra-curricular 
program, Bernie was best known as captain 
of our tennis team. His studies of stress and 
strain at City may not result in a better tennis 
racquet but they will make Bernie an excellent 
engineer. 

"Anyone for tennis" 

Kellmanetsky 




PHILIP BURSKY 

Arista 4-8; CO. Sec'y-Treas. 7; Elchanite 
Business Mgr. 7, 8; Class President 2, 3: 
Student Court 6, 7; Tennis Team 6-8: Chess 
Team 5-8; J.V. Basketball Team 3-6; Service 
Squad 1-4; Topics Staff 5, 6; Library Squad 
1. 

Phil, also known as "Shraga Faivel Boor- 
sky", excelled in both the Talmud and secu- 
lar departments. As Elchanite Business 
Manager he was a man to be avoided but as 
a friend he was very much in demand. Capi- 
talizing on his flair for physics and math Phil 
will study engineering. 

"If he had any faults he left us in doubt." 
Goldsmith 




^^^ 






^ H. Mandel prepares for Regent Scholarship Exams. 





ALAN BALSAM 

G.O. Vice-President 7, Sec'y-Treas. 5 ; Elcha- 
nite Co-Editor 7, 8; Topics News Editor 5, 
6; School Debating Team 7, 8; Class Presi- 
dent 3 ; Class Debating Manager 2, 4 ; Tennis 
Team 6-8. 

Twice a member of our Executive Council, 
Alan was welt versed in the ways of politics. 
Besides being a top student his interests lay 
in the Topics and the Elchanite. In true 
Balsam tradition he wilt study taw at Yeshiva. 

"He who has the judge for his father goes 

into court with an easy mind." 

Cervantes 




A. Fruchter, H. Kuritzky, H. Lerner, and M. Press prepare apparatus for physics lesson. 




i 





ISAAC BLACHOR 

Varsity Basketball Team 7, 8; Class Debating 
Team 1-8; Service Squad 3-7; Class Athletic 
Manager 4; Chess Team 4; Elchanite Art 
Squad 8; Variety Nite 4, 6. 

Ike, our Albany Heights representative, 
charmed us for four years with his brilliant 
oratory. He excelled as well in Varsity basket- 
ball but failed in an attempt to form a pho- 
tography club. Blessed with Mr. Gold's good 
wishes he will continue his studies at Brook- 
lyn. 

"One picture is worth a thousand words." 
M.G.M. 



JOSEPH DAINA 

Variety Nite 5, 7; Service Squad 6; Office 
Squad 6, 7; Chess Team 1-4; Elchanite Art 
Squad 8. 

When Sonny came to Y.U.H.S.B. from 
Crown Heights, he did it the long way — 
through Germany. Famous for his imitations 
of faculty members he entertained us con- 
stantly. He will follow in his father's footsteps 
and study for the Rabbinate. 

"Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery." 
Paine 



JACK FEIN 

Elchanite Typing Editor 7, 8: Elchanite Art 
Squad 7, 8; Hebrew Library 5-8; Glee Club 
7 ; Service Squad 7. 

Jack, one of the Doc's "truly fein" boys, 
was best known for his proficiency in Hebrew 
history. His willingness to do hard work was 
demonstrated by his conscientious efforts as 
a member of the Elchanite staff. .4n amateur 
chemist and nature lover, he will pursue a 
pre-medical course at Yeshiva. 

"I really think Y.U.H.S.B. is exquisite 
And some day I'm going to pay it a visit." 
Mostly from Ogden Nash 



19 



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DANIEL PRIMMER 

Topics Sports Editor 4, 5; Topics Staff 2, 3; 
Varsity Basketball Team 5-8; Varsity Mgr. 
3, 4; Tennis Team Co-Captain 6-8; Track 
Team 6-8; Class Athletic Mgr. 5, Debating 
Team 1, 7; Co-op Staff 2; Variety Nite 4; 
Service Squad 2-5: Hebrew Library 2. 

Danny, though participating inconspicu- 
ously, was one of the most active of our ath- 
letes. Not limiting himself to sports alone he 
participated as well in many other extra- 
curricular activities. Outstanding scholasti- 
cally as well he will continue toward success 
at Yeshiva. 

"Variety is the spice of life." 

Cowper 



AZRIEL FEINER 

CO. Sec'y-Treas. 8; Ticket Bureau Manager 
5, 6; Co-op Staff 1-6; Service Squad 3-6; 
Class Debating Team 1-4, Sec'y-Treas. 4, 5, 
7; Topics Typing Stail 4. 

''Ezzie" substantiated claims that he was a 
big man by becoming G.O. Secretary-Treas- 
urer in our last term. The consensus of opin- 
ion is that future candidates will have trouble 
filling his shoes (size 13). He will take all 74 
inches up to Yeshiva to continue along his 
path to fame. 

"As large as life." 

Edgeworth 



HERSHEL FARKAS 

G.O. President 7, Sec'y-Treas. 6; Student 
Court 8; Co-op Mgr. 5, 6; Class Vice-Presi- 
dent 8; Kolenu Editor 6; Varsity Basketball 
Team 1-8; Variety Nite 6; Class Athletic 
Mgr. 1-3; Track Team 6-8; Swimming Team 
7, 8; Arista 4-8. 

Hesh rightfully earned the title of most ver- 
satile senior. While gaining fame as Varsity 
captain, he took time out from setting basket- 
ball records for affairs of state. His extra- 
curricular activities kept him out of class 
more often than not, adding yet another rec- 
ord to his list. 

"Jack of all trades and master of most." 
Old Elchanite 



Headquarters for politics andpublicntions. the GO. office is constantly in use. 



20 







Rabbi A. N . Ziiroff and J. Levy discuss student affairs. 

"^a-^J^'i- y<y^ ^;^-^^ <=^ -^^ — 






AARON FRUCHTER 

Elchanite Co-Editor 7, 8, Art Squad 1-8; 
Class President 1, 5, 6, Vice-President 3, 
Debating Team 4-6; Arista 4-8, Vice-Leader 
6; Track Team 6-8; Chess Team 5-8: J.V. 
Basketball Team 5,6: Co-op Staff 3-6: Service 
Squad 2-4: Hebrew Library \, 2. 

Popular and talented, Aaron proved his 
versatility by dabbling in everything from 
sports to politics. His artistic ability was an 
asset both to the Elchanite and to his class- 
mates. A top student, he will continue to im- 
press both friends and faculty at Yeshiva. 

"Art is power.' 

Longfellow 





NATHAN FINKIEL 

Elchanite Art Editor 7, 8: Service Squad 
Lieutenant 7: Topics Staff 6, 8: Oflk-e Squad 
7; Variety Nile 3-8. 

Nady, the class humorist, kept us amused 
with his acts for four years. His biggest joke 
was coming to school without his hair. Future 
performances will emanate from Yeshiva 
where he will follow in his father's footsteps 
and become a Rabbi. 

"He who has great strength should 

use it lightly." 

Seneca 



PHILIP FRIEDMAN 

Service Squad Lieutenant 7: Lost and Found 
Mgr. 5-7: Ticket Bureau 5-7; Service Squad 
3-7 ; Office Squad 6 ; Varsity Mgr. 7, 8 ; Variety 
Nile 4-6: Class Charity Collector 6. 

Phil, our redheaded delegate from Browns- 
ville, has a promising future ahead of him. 
Whether he expands from a locker to a shop 
and goes into business or capitalizes on his 
religious knowledge and becomes a preacher 
we know he will be a success. 

"Preach without words of purity." 
Rossett 



21 




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examining Talmud classes . 



MELVIN GALUN 

Service Squad 7; Glee Club 5, 6; Variety 
Nite 5-8; Kolenu 7, 8; Elchanite Art Squad 
7, 8; Varsity Swimming Team 7, 8. 

Coming to T.A. from Poland by way of 
Toras Chaim, Mel impressed us with his 
frankness. Noted for his compositions in third 
year English, his candidness was appreciated 
by all including Mr. Gallant. He will continue 
his writing at Brooklyn. 

"Speak out, hide not thy thoughts." 
Homer 



URIEL GOTTESMAN 

Elchanite Business Manager 7, 8: Topics Cir- 
culation Staff 7, 8; Variety Nite 3, 4, 7, 8; 
J.V. Basketball 5, 6; Track Team 5-8; Class 
Debating Team 1, 2; Glee Club 3; Class 
Business Manager 3, 4; Service Squad 1, 2; 
Hebrew Library 1, 2; English Library 3, 4. 

A fresh air enthusiast, Gotty spent most of 
his four years in the backyard. Between extra- 
curricular activities e.g. intramurals and 
Saturday nights, he found time to organize a 
mutual admiration society with the *'Doc.'^ 
Remembered for his quiet nudging as Elcha- 
nite Business Manager, he will continue 
nudging teachers at Y.U, 

"All the world loves a lover" 

Lilker's Wedding 



Rabbi P. Yogel keeps himself busy interviewing new students 





MOSES GEFFEN 

Elchanite Typing Editor 7, 8; Chess Team 
Captain 3, 4; Swimming Team 7; Service 
Squad 3-5. 

Moish was our good neighbor delegate from 
Colombia. He introduced us to such distinctly 
Latin American products as sugar cane, bum 
cigarette lighters, and cheap watchbands. He 
will continue his good will tour at City. 

"Oh lovely Colombia, renowned romantic 

land." 

Mostly from Byron 



22 





and keeping up with the "Times." 




WILLIAM GOLUB 

Student Court Chief Justice 8: Variety Nite 
5, 6; Service Squad 7, 8; Class Business 
Manager 7; Class Secretary-Treasurer 8; Class 
Charity Collector 7; Office Squad 7. 

Willy was conspicuous in class by his 
silence and lack of chutzpa. Liked by the 
teachers for his good manners and by his 
classmates for his good nature, he will strive 
toward the Rabbinate at Y'eshiva. 

"Silence is more eloquent than words." 
Carlyle 



SAUL GANCHROW 

Class President 1, 7; Class Vice-President 2, 
3; Class Debating Team 1, 4, 8; Variety Nite 
1-8; Variety Nite Leader 7, 8: Service Squad 
3-5. 

Saul, the good-natured proprietor of the 
best equipped locker in Y.U.H.S.B., supplied 
us with everything from jokes to bombs. A 
tireless worker for Variety \ite and our an- 
nual Chagigas. his humor was appreciated by 
students and faculty alike. He will follow in 
his brother's footsteps at Y.V . 

"Eating raaketh a full man." 

Plapialebowitz 



STEPHEN GROSSBARD 

Class Debating Team 1-8: Class Debating 
Mgr. 1, 2, 8; Class Vice-President 7: Service 
Squad 2-6; Co-op Staff 5; Hebrew Library 1. 

Steve spent his senior year supporting 
"Chet the jet", Adlai. and Rabbi Schmid- 
man. The other three years, he majored 
mostly in baseball pools and debating. He 
will continue the Grossbard name at Colum- 
bia in the fall. 

"He ser\es his party best." 

Hayes 



23 




LARRY GREENFIELD 

Chess Team 5-8, Captain 7. 8: Arista 5-8: 
School Debating Team 8; Class Debating 
Team 1-8; Debating Manager 3-6; Class Ath- 
letic Manager 4; Class Sec'y-Treas. 1, 2, 6. 

Displaying an affinity for the chess board, 
Larry, captain of the chess team, won noto- 
riety as the inventor of the pocket portable 
chess set. He also gained distinction for the 
humorous minutes he took as Class Secretary- 
Treasurer. His conscientiousness and good 
marks will make him an excellent engineer. 

"Life's too short for chess." 

H. J. Byron 



MARTIN HOCHMAN 

School Athletic Mgr. 7, 8; Varsity Basketball 
Team 5-8; Handball Team 5-8; J.V. Basket- 
ball Team 3, 4; English Library 5. 

Marty insured himself good marks by 
calmly memorizing the text books before each 
test. While entering a year late he produced 
a notable effect on teachers and friends. His 
conscientiousness brought him success in ath- 
letics, politics, and studies and will continue 
to do so at Brooklyn in the fall. 

"My cake is dough." 

Shakespeare 



ALAN HYMAN 

Elchanite Literary Editor 7, 8; School Debat- 
ing Team 4-8; Class Debating Team 1-8; 
-Arista 4-8; Tennis Team 7, 8; Chess Team 6; 
J.V. Basketball Team 5, 6; Topics Staff 5-7; 
Service Squad 3-5; Co-op Staff 4; Hebrew 
Library 1 : English Library 3. 

Alan, also known as "Honeyball", astounded 
his classmates by his skill at writing and 
debating and his proficiency at dreidl. Proud 
of his record of never having been caught 
taking a book home, he will leave his law 
books at Columbia in the future. 

'"Whoso would be a man must be a 

nonconformist." 

Emerson 




24 



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8:59 — one minute before the rush upstairs. 



IRA KELLMAN 

G.O. President 8: Elchanite Activities Editor 
7, 8; Co-op Executive Mgr. 7, Asst. Mgr. 5, 
6; School Debating Team 5, 6; Class Vice- 
President 6, Debating Team 1-8, Debating 
Mgr. 5, Business Mgr. 4, Sec'y-Treas. 2 ; Vari- 
ety Nite 7, 8. 

The Republican Party's disciple in 
Y.U.H.S.B., Ira made it a complete sweep by 
getting in as president along with Ike. 
Though outnumbered 2 to 1 in history he 
fought the Democrats as best he could. 
Elected Class Orator, he will talk his way 
through Brooklyn. 

"Peace, Progress, and Prosperity." 
D. D. Eisenhower 





MORTON KAPLAN 

Varsity Basketball Team 5-8; Junior Varsity 
Basketball Team 1-4; Class .\thletic Manager 
1, 2, 5, 6. 

"Moish" confined his activities as exclu- 
sively as possible to athletics. Forced to ease 
up in his senior year, he replaced Harry's 
bus service to Borough Park. He ivill continue 
his education at Brooklyn. 

"His car is in first crash condition." 



M^ 



swiped by Levy 



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PERRY KRAVIT 

Service Squad 7 ; Class Secretary-Treasurer 5. 

Perry ran into much difficulty due to his 
nickname, as he was often confused with his 
senior year "Rebi." Pete spent four years 
gathering his amazing collection of birthdays 
and will continue to do so between courses at 
City. 

".\nd he hath not forgotten my age." 
Southy 



25 






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OLIVER KLAPPER 

Variety Nile 4-8: Glee Club 3-8; Tennis Team 
6-8; Track Team 5-8: Co-op Staff 5-8; Serv- 
ice Squad 6, 7: English Library- 3, 4; Hebrew 
Library 1 : Class Business Mgr. 7. 

As a freshman Ollie told us he was musi- 
cally inclined and spent the next four years 
convincing us. Active in Variety Nite and 
Chagigas his sense of humor stood him in 
good stead. Our perennial sanitation manager, 
his cleanliness will help him as he studies 
pre-medicine at Brooklyn. 

"Music is the universal language of 

mankind." 

Longfellow 



ARNOLD KREGER 

Track Team 4-8: Topics Business Staff 2; 
Class Debating Team 3: Class Secretary- 
Treasurer 5: Service Squad 7. 

Conscientious disciple of the "Cluck," 
Arnie was completely captivated by Chemis- 
try. His "extremely delicate sense of smeW 
was probably not an asset during the HoS 
experiment but it did not deter him from his 
ultimate goal. He will continue towards a 
pharmacy degree at the Brooklyn School of 
Pharmacy. 

"For science is ... , like virtue, its own 

exceedingly great reward." 

Kingsly 





HARVEY KURITZKY 

Chess Team Captain 5, 6; Service Squad 3. 
4; Library Squad 3, 4: Class Athletic Mgr. 8. 

Harv gave us all a shock in eighth term- 
when he announced he was not yet sweet six- 
teen. In his case beauty came before age and 
he was elected handsomest senior. After study- 
ing mechanical magazines for four hours 
every morning he will take up aeronautical 
engineering at Brooklyn Poly. 

"Grow old along with me, the best is yet 

to be." 

Browning 



26 



A potpourri of student art decorates the wall out- 
side the art room. 




MORTON LEIBOWITZ 

Elohanite Activities Editor 7, 8; Class Presi- 
dent 4, 8; Class Vice-President 1, 3; Topics 
Staff 2, 7, 8 ; Variety Nite 7, 8 ; Service Squad 
5. 

Morty, never one jot glory, was always to 
he found working hard behind the scenes. His 
graduation will be sorely felt by all of our 
extra-curricular activities and teachers. Our 
loss will he Brooklyn's gain. 

"The deed is everything, the glory naught." 
Goethe 



VJOCIIIC A 




HENRY LERNER 

Varsity Basketball Team 5-8; J.V. Basketball 
Team 3, 4; Class Athletic Mgr. 6, 7: Office 
Squad 5, 8; Class Business Mgr. 8. 

Thoughtful and considerate. Butch took 
time out from basketball and music to advise 
the "shark" when to shave. The proximity oj 
Central was most appreciated by him as he 
loved "t'filah b'tzibur". For the next few 
years he will leave his bike outside of Brook- 
lyn where he will major in chemistry. 

"He prayeth best who loveth best."' 
Coleridge 



MARVIN LIEBMAN 

Variety Nite 7, 8; Glee Club 7, 8: Service 
Squad 7. 

An outstanding ping-pong player and math 
student. Marv spent till 4 years keeping his 
hair out oj his eyes. He managed, however, to 
see clearly enough to receive a Hausman 
Award. He is another oj our boys who intends 
to become an engineer at City. 

"A fine head of hair adds beauty to 

a good face." 

Plutarch 



27 





MARTIN LEBOWITZ 

School Athletic Mgr. 6; Elchanite Art Editor 
7, 8; Class Athletic Mgr. 3-5; Class Debating 
Team 1-3; Service Squad 6, 7; Varsity Mgr. 
6-8; Hebrew Library 1-3; Office Squad 5, 6; 
Variety Nite 3-8. 

Artist, ping pong whiz, and humorist, 
Marty kept us in stitches with his quick wit 
and good-natured kidding. Between jokes he 
joundtime to pilfer art for the Elchanite. He 
will continue pleasing friends at Brooklyn. 

"The wise make jests." 

Ray 



JOSHUA LEVY 

Elchanite Editor-in-Chief 7, 8; Elchanite Art 
Squad 1-8; Student Court Justice 7; Arista 
5-8; Class Vice-President 5-7; Topics Staff 6; 
Co-op Staff 6; Class Debating Team 2; Serv- 
ice Squad 5, 6; Hebrew Library 1-5. 

Good grades, a friendly manner, and 
school service characterized Josh's four years 
at Y.U.H.S.B. After dabbling in art and poli- 
tics he surprised no one by being elected 
Elchanite Editor-in-Chief. looted for his dress- 
ing habits. Josh was elected Best Dressed 
Senior and in a few years he expects to be a 
well-dressed doctor. 

".\ fair exterior is a silent 

recommendation." 

Syrus 



JOSEPH LIFSCHITZ 

Topics Staff 7, 8; Variety Nite 2, 3; Glee 
Club 5; Service Squad 3, 5, 7; Office Squad 
7; Class Debating Team 7, 8, Athletic Mgr. 
2, 3, 4, 7, Business Mgr. 5, 6; Varsity Bas- 
ketball Team 7, 8; Swimming Team Captain 
7, 8; Tennis Team 7; Track Team 7, 8; J.V. 
Basketball Team 6. 

Although hindered in his junior year by a 
brace on his leg, Joe became our school's 
first 4-letter man by serving on the tennis, 
track, swimming and basketball teams. Ver- 
satile, popular, and handsome, he will con- 
tinue at Yeshiva U. 

"Aristocracy is a graceful ornament." 
Leibowitz 



Long hours cause empty stomachs — John sells food during the mid-day rush. 





28 





^■^^J^ 



V 





ALLEN MANDEL 

Variety Nile 5-8; Elchanite Typing Squad 7, 
8: Office Squad 5,6. 

Allan, our outspoken senator from Uptown, 
proved an invaluable aid in the prolonging of 
class meetings. Though he didn't quite make 
Administrator he almost had Mrs. Rosen- 
man's job. This good-natured fellow will work 
for a teacher's degree at Yeshiva. 

"Go directly to the office. Do not pass GO. 

Do not collect. . . ." 

Shmidman, by way of Parker Bros. 



;^^,^ru^ f>U^ 





HARVEY MANDEL 

Elchanite Literary Editor 7, 8: .Crista 4-8; 
Arista Secretary-Treasurer 8; Service Squad 
4; Hebrew Library 1; Class Debating Team 
3; Co-op Staff 5: Class Secretary-Treasurer 
3,4. 

Harvey quietly maintained a high average 
in both the Talmud and secular departments. 
His relationship to .Mr. Lilker secured him a 
permanent seat on the Borough Park bus. He 
will major in pre-med at Columbia. 

"He who has the relative for his teacher 
goes into class with an easy mind." 
Cer\antes by nay of Balsam 



FREDERICK NATHAN 

Elchanite Activities Editor 7, 8; Mishmar 
Leader 7. 8: Topics Bulletin 5-8; Topics 
Typing Staff 5-8: Hebrew Library 1-8; Serv- 
ice Squad 4. Captain 8. 

Our social science expert. "King Fredrick 
IV" reigned over the mishmar and the service 
squad. His editorial on yiddishkeit brought 
forth a shower of criticism from the admini- 
stratioK. He intends to create new literary 
storms during his soujourn at Yeshiva. 

"A good King is a Public Servant." 
Ben Johnson 



29 










JACK NESS 

Topics Bulletin Editor-in-Chief 7, 8, Ass't 
Editor 4-6; Elchanite Activities Editor 7, 8; 
Topics News Editor 7, Typing Editor 4-6; 
Elchanite Typing Squad 5, 6; Service Squad 
Captain 8; Student Court 7; Kolenu 7, 8; 
Hebrew Library 2-4; Class Debating Team 1. 

Jack, a very .busy boy, divided his time be- 
tween Y.U.HS.B.'s publications and the 
Service Squad, rising to the top position in 
each. Our Topics Bulletin editor provided 
many a controversial topic for discussion. His 
architectural designs will surely be the talk 
of Pratt. 

"An editor is the architect of public 

opinion." 

Anon E. Mous 



MARK PRESS 

Elchanite Editor-in-Chief 7, 8; Topics Man- 
aging Editor 7, Copy Editor 5, 6: Kolenu 
Editor 5, 6; Student Court 6-8; Chief Justice 
7; Arista 4-8, Sec'y 6, Leader 7; Class De- 
bating Manager 3, 8, Debating Team 1, 3-8, 
Sec'y-Treas. 4; Hebrew Library 1-3; Lab. 
Ass't 5-8. 

Mark, the only senior whose l.Q. runs into 
four digits, eclipsed all previous achievements 
by being class sanitation manager and 
Elchanite Editor-in-Chief simultaneously. His 
outstanding scholastic and extracurricular 
endeavors won him the acclaim of both stu- 
dents and faculty. He will continue instruct- 
ing his teachers at Y.U. 

"All things are slaves to intelligence." 
Menander 




J^^ 





As an extra project for his art course H. Adelman constructs a miniature dream house. 



MICHAEL OSTROW 

Elchanite Business Manager 7, 8; Class Busi- 
ness Manager 5, 6; Variety Nite 1-5; Class 
Athletic Manager 1 ; Varsity Basketball Team 
5-8; Tennis Team 5, 6; J. V. Basketball Team 
1-4. 

Originator and expert in the use of the 
negative T.L., Mike was well known to all. In 
his freshman year he set a 54-point record 
in an intramural game and followed this up 
with two years on the Varsity. He will study 
advertising at Rutgers. 

"I think, therefore I am." 

Descartes 



30 




Four members of the Radio Club attempt to contact the outside with our rccently-iu quired 
transmitter. 




BENYOMEN REISS 

Class Vice-President 3; Arista 5-8; Class De- 
bating Team 3, 4. 

Leihel was Mr. Wallach's chief source of 
"nachas" iti a class composed mainly of 
"gazabos." Attaining Arista membership in 
fifth term helped him in Mr. Lebowitz's 
courses. Leibel will continue his math at City 
where he will follow family tradition and 
study accounting. 

"Like Father like Son." 

From the French 



HYMAN SAPERSTIEN 

Topics Staff 5-8; Service Squad 6; Class 
Elchanite Business Manager 7, 8. 

Rather than spend his time on extra cur- 
ricular activities Hy spent his four years 
making friends. Voted Best-Matured Senior 
he displayed this trait in his likable joking 
manner. Noted in Y.U.H.S.B. for his ability 
to predict the weather 25% of the time he 
will study meteorology. 

"The only way to have a friend is to be 

one." 

Emerson 



SHELDON STEIN 

Elchanite Literary Staff 7, 8: English Libran 
5; Kolenu 7: Variety Nite 5-8; Glee Club 5. 
6; Topics Staff 5-8; Service Squad 6-8. 

Shelly's outstanding talents were his sing- 
ing and writing abilities. He capitalized on 
both in Y.U.H.S.B. by being active in lariety 
Mite and on the Topics. In the future he will 
concentrate on literature and major in Eng- 
lish. 

"The pen is mightier than the song." 
butchered from Franklin 



31 





STAN SUSSMAN 

Arista 6-8; Class President 5, 6, 8, Vice- 
President 4; Student Court 6-8; Topics 
Sports Editor 5-8; English Library 3-5; Class 
Debating Team 1-4. 

Stan, voted most popular senior, increased 
his popularity by putting "Jones" in his place 
in seventh term. Outstanding in every phase of 
school life, Stan's knack for schoolwork will 
hold him in good stead at City where he plans 
to become an engineer. 

■'Popularity disarms envy in well disposed 

minds.'" 

Hazlitt 



JOEL TAGER 

Topics Photography Editor 5, 6; Topics 1-6: 
Service Squad 1-6; Service Squad Lieutenant 
7; Varsity Manager 7, 8; Class Debating 
Team 2-4; Kolenu Staff 6. 

As a manager of the Varsity. Joe was active 
behind the scenes of Y.U.H.S.B. athletics. 
Between carrying balls for the Varsity and 
pursuing his photographic interests, he found 
time to carry a full academic program. .4 
conscientious student, he ivill meet with suc- 
cess in his civil engineering studies at City. 

"He will build his bridges as he comes to 

them." 

Pilfered by Levy 



JACOB TESLER 

Elchanite Photography Editor 7, 8; Service 
Squad Lieutenant 7; Class President 2; Class 
Vice-President 1: Chess Team 7; Variety 
Nite 7, 8. 

Liberal and broadminded. Jack never let 
school interfere with his education. His flair 
for photography made him one of Schultzie's 
frequent visitors. An aptitude for science will 
assure him success in his pharmaceutical 
studies at Columbia. 

"G-d heals and the pharmacist takes the 

fee." 

Franklin 




32 



M. Leibowitz and I. Kellmcin prepare santhviches for the 
annual Purim Chagiga. 






You can't go wrong betting on a Le(i)bowitz in this game. As Morty and 
Marty battle it out, a crowd soon collects to watch. 



SHELDON WEISER 

Elchanite Photography Editor 7, 8; Arista 
5-8; Arista Secretary-Treasurer 7; Co-op StafF 
5, 6; Topics Staff 4-6; English Library 1-5. 

Shelly, our lone representative from Ben- 
sonhurst. had the dubious distinction of 
always saying the wrong thing at the wrong 
time. His humorous comments failed to win 
the admiration of the faculty but they en- 
deared him to his fellow students. A good stu- 
dent and amateur photographer, he will 
ma/or in pre-med at Brooklyn. 
"He developed his personality in the dark- 
room." 

Kodak 





MYRON ZINAMAN 

G.O. Vice-President 8; Elchanite Business 
Manager 7, 8; Service Squad 5, 6, Captain 7: 
Class President 7, Debating Manager 4-6, De- 
bating Team 2-8, Business Mgr. 3; School 
Debating Team 7, 8 ; Topics StaflF 4-6 ; Hebrew 
Library 4; Arista 5-8, Vice-Leader 7; Tennis 
Team 6-8. 

Devotion to his school highlights Myron's 
four years. Coming all the way from Bayside 
he served as Vice-President and did a great 
job. Well liked by classmates and teachers 
he was voted Most Conscientious Senior and 
will study pre-med at Columbia. 

"Virtue it its own reward." 

Cicero 



MORRIS ZAUDERER 

Topics Editor-in-Chief 7. 8; Topics Business 
Manager 5, 6; Topics Staff 3. 4; Elchanite 
Photography Editor 7, 8; Kolenu 3-6; Class 
Debating Team 1-6; Class Debating Manager 
1 ; Glee Club 1-6; Tennis Team 6-8. 

Mr. Wallach's nemesis. Moish refused to 
drop the course. What he lacked in math he 
made up in journalism and established a 
precedent by jumping from business manager 
of the Topics to Editor-in-Chief. He will con- 
tinue badgering administrations with his edi- 
torials at Yeshiva. 
"I fear three newspapers more than a hun- 
dred bayonets." 

Napoleon 

33 




PAINS 




The growth of an institution is often marked by 
distinctive events. Our four years at the Yeshiva 
were no exception. 

An administrator advanced to the position of 
principal; 

Bachelor faculty members married and one has 
since become a proud papa; 

An old, old building was traded in for a new 
old building; 

The well-liked name B.T.A. was changed to the 
tongue-twister Y.U.H.S.B. . . . etc. . . . etc. ... ad 
nauseam. 

When thinking back, we recall the pains of devel- 
oping from dumb freshies into even dumber seniors 
sometimes with dismay but always with laughter. 

FRESHMEN 

TOLD not to judge a book by its cover, we begin 
our high school careers at 1060 President Street 
. . . Report to an old auto barn (they call this a 
gym!?) for Freshman Orientation . . . Elevator pas- 
ses, admits, program cards, administrator — what's 
that? . . . Boro Park bus service instituted — Rebbies 
say class starts at 9:00, Harry says 9:20 — bus serv- 
ice discontinued . . . Durchin's class forced to use 
Dum Dum Express . . . Lichty teaches us Aleph- 
Beiss . . . Forty-five minute periods cut to fifteen 
when Nady brings doorbell to class . . . Since when 
can lox rain from the ceiling? — Shmidman's class 
tops that with falling fluorescents . . . Eider's Shas, 



A. Feiner welcomes new recruit (L. Lipnick) 



34 




MjUMl 




"So you come to make trouoie, eh! 




a once-in-a-lifetime bargain, takes almost a lifetime 
to arrive . . . We are introduced to Bachelor's Club 
— Messrs. Bassell, Lilker, Kallner, and Perlman . . . 
One Talmud teacher attempts rescue of dummy 
hanging outside his window — "So you come to 
make trrauble, eh!" . . . Teddy loses in bout with 
bus stop sign — breaks arm . . . Julie calls us Tal- 
mudic sneaks . . . Kallner recuperates in time to get 
his fruit flies drunk on moonshine whiskey . . . 
Flash! Bedford Appliances has a fire sale — Rebbies 
burn . . . Faivy cashes in on upsurge of interest in 
Hebrew culture by selling Hebrew-English, Hebrew- 
Hebrew, English-Hebrew, and English-English dic- 
tionaries — Buys a new car . . . Minors: All who 
bend-extend and bring dental note and sneakers 
get ninety-five . . . Grossman: "I don't care if you 
fall out of the window, but I'd just hate to fill out 
all those forms" . . . Our first music teacher runs out 
of zeros and quits — New one gains fame by rolling 
up his shirtsleeves to prove he's a man . . . Music 
appreciation clashes with Sunday English — "But 
Mr. Sanders, everyone knows we daven mincha in 
class on Sunday!" ... In Art a herringbone tweed 
tells us to crawl back into the woodwork . . . 
Chaiga : Zuckerberg threatens to fix our wagons — 
We don't know what he's talking about but enjoy 
the show anyway . . . Straight from the front lines 
— War rages between "Honeyballs" and "Schmaltz- 



ies" in Friedman's civics class . . . Kallner cam- 
paigns to be our biology teacher by promising a tie 
in every locker — His platform also includes a home 
economics course and spelling practice (tszitsziss) 
. . . R.E.B. gives us 90% of final — I dare say, class 
barely passes . . . The year ends amidst rumors 
propagated by the "Tropics" that arrangements 
have been made to move B.T.A. to ShelleyviUe, 
Florida. 



A career in debating begins for S. Crossbard 





"One point for the Schmaltzies.' 



35 



SOPHOMORES 



WE move south — along Bedford Avenue, a far 
cry from Florida; our new location is at 
Church and Bedford Avenues . . . New gym proves 
to be highly air-conditioned — games called on ac- 
count of rain . . . Finally get to know what an 
excused admit looks like, as the Dragon Lady is 
replaced by a secretary with a heart . . . Helen does 
bookkeeping as Mrs. Rosenman takes over admin- 
istrator's duties . . . 

Mrs. Rosenman: Where were you yesterday? 

Boy: I went to the movies. 

Mrs. Rosenman: Here's an excused admit, I don't 

believe you. 




"But, Mrs. Rosenman, the bus was late." 




Starting foreign language, we get a very punny 
French teacher, Mr. Brender ... He keeps every- 
thing under his hat . . . French students find new 
use for English Library, test marks zoom! . . . Span- 
ish — Senor threatens to take off "Red's" face and 
slap his glasses . . . Promising to fix our wagons, 
he still defends the class when confronted by Mel- 
vin, a Dermochelys coriacea . . . We got another 
taste of Lichty — He says we're the best class he ever 



We move south 



had . . . We'll teach him! . . . "But, Doc, do you 
always fail the boys you love?" . . . Faivy leaves, 
who'll ask for Elchanite adssss now? . . . New He- 
brew teacher drives us punchy — seems to be forever 
in mourning — wears pants at half mast . . . Kallner 
teaches us facts of life — Boys lose faith in his teach- 
ing abilities as even his hamsters won't make 
whoopee . . . 

Kallner: What's the difference between an egg 

and a bean? 

Kellman: You try sitting on a bean. 
Lichty teaches us Aleph-Beiss . . . Elchanite wins 
Medalist award for first time — something to live up 
to . . . First of Bachelors bites the dust as Mr. Bas- 
sell gets hooked . . . New music teacher reaches 
great heights while Climbing Jacob's Ladder — 
Causes riot singing "My Country 'Tis Of Thee ..." 
We watch the "Kenny Mutiny'^ and can't believe 
that those things really go on — Wait till next y^ 




fiJfULtk/ 



B.T.A. gets a business section as Co-op and candy 
store open in the basement . . . New course: "Chin- 
uch" — Extent of the four year course — four days 
at a dollar a day . . . Hemingway's "OLD MAN 
and the Sea" retires into the teaching profession at 
B.T.A. . . . Co-op embarks on campaign to live 
down Socol's Folly . . . 

Septimus: Boys, I'd drop a pupindicula if I had a 

ruler. 

Student: Can't you use your Hushey Ba'? 




-x/ 




il ■ I ,s> 



-MM i 




/I 



p I 







New gym proves to be highly air-conditioned 



"All right, boys! You win!" 



Regents Time: Slow Moe tells us not to eat bananas, 
not to get sunburned, and to get to sleep by 6 : 00 the 
night before . . . All studying almost goes to waste 
as we nearly fail the most important test of all — 
how to get to Y.U. . . . The par for the course is two 
and a half hours traveling time . . . Everyone passes 
and we look forward to our third and most impor- 
tant year at B.T.A. 




37 



U N I 



OUR junior year starts with a bang as the Union 
City art gallery opens . . . Rabbi Zuroflf be- 
comes Principal — Only real difference is that Mrs. 
Rosenman becomes a principal's secretary . . . Cap- 
tain Gallant's prescription for enjoying American 
literature course — leave out American literature 
. . . Slick Willy tells the fellows to sit on the floor 
and let their feet dangle . . . Typical chemistry ex- 
periment: "When I pour this into this it will turn 
yellow — It's supposed to turn yellow — You boys 
will just have to take my word for it." . . . Lichty 
threatens not to send us to the Regents, reminding 



us that we "are not yet seniors" . . . Kenny gives up 
on shiur method — introduces lecture . . . Filter 
brand cigarettes are the most popular among Reb- 
bies — Ask Punchy, he knows . . . Second of Bache- 
lors falls prey as Mr. Lilker marries one of his 
former students — Bouncing Teddy decides he'd 
rather keep company with a machine and leaves for 
I.B.M. . . . After studying world history from the 
broad philosophical viewpoint we get caught on 
Mr. LUker's technical catch questions — We com- 
plain to our guidance counselor — Surprise!! . . . 
Lichty teaches us Aleph-Beiss . . . "What's your 





/--'/iV 



Five regents in three days 



38 





name, little boy?" — "Zello" — "That's not a name, 
that's a housing project!" ... A Whale of a Mish- 
mar is started and is very successful . . . Talmud 
teachers show off their mathematical prowess by 
giving numerical marks — What Rebbie is giving 
73.6 for a grade? . . . Bob masquerades as a houn' 
dog ^nd turns up a salami sandwich — Tells us to 
rub him the right way . . . 

Fast Moe: Heymoe 

Slow Moe;. W-h-o m-e 

Fast Moe: Yeahyou 

Slow Moe: O-h. 
Our families are startled at the Seder table as we 
recite the four questions in French . . . Election 
for Elchanite editors; We're elected Activities Edi- 
tors — what's that? — We'll learn, maybe not soon 
enough but we'll learn . . . Our boys hit the political 
trail with Farkas, Balsam, and Bursky being elected 
President, Vice-President, and Secretary-Treasurer 
respectively . . . Seiior's Spanish Mishmar helps us 
at the Regents, but not as much as the proctor . . . 
We end our most eventful year in B.T.A. with five 
Regents in three days — A record. 



J. Ness, M. Zauderer, and 
S. Stein scan -election news 



39 



HIGH SGHPn' 



'^* 




At pre-playoff rally H. Farkas emphasizes need of student support 







SENIORS 

WE return and find we are now attending 
Y.U.H.S.B.B Well, we finally made it— 

we are Lichty's worst class . . . One more Bachelor 
bites the dust as Rabbi Perlman gets married — Mr. 
Kallner makes out well at I.B.M. . . . The adminis- 
tration, thinking we are sick, hires two new doctors 
— M'yess, it's sabotaage! . . . Dr. Horwitz presides 
over many interesting class meetings, but he doesn't 
think its ethical to allow a class to discuss cutting 
sixth period — so the class discusses cutting fifth 
period instead . . . Levy assures the Doctor, m'yess, 
that our class meetings are running the school . . . 
Lichty teaches us Gimel-Daled . . . Republicans 
sweep important posts as Ike and Kellman get in 
— Kenny spends rest of year trying to get Ike and 
Kellman out . . . Overhead in Doc's class: 

Office Monitor: Does anyone want to order the 

Times or Tribune? 

Doc: Boy, you ask me first. 

Monitor: Okay, Doc do you want the Times or 

Tribune. 
Bulletin editorial arouses Rabbi Zuroff — He finally 
discovers what the second floor looks like- — Ness 
finally discovers what Rabbi ZurofFs office looks 
like . . . Brender, tired of swimming, leaves the 
library to the Shark . . . Seniors get their long 
sought after lounge despite Mrs. Rosenman's pro- 
tests . . . Our new economics teacher turns out to be 
a good friend of Jiminy Cricket . . . Purcell has a 
handy way to quiet a class — He just gives them a 
surprise test — Surprise! We all hand in blank 
papers — Surprise! We all fail . . . Mr. Lebowitz's 
favorite question: what cluck taught you elemen- 
tary algebra? . . . Recess time in Rabbi Shmidman's 
class: Rabbi Shmidman: Come Kaplan, let's move 
our cars . . . Kenny adopts policy of watchful wait- 



40 





Relaxing in senior lounge 

P. Friedman, J. Daina, and N. Finkiel 

exchange school gossip. 



ing, demanding equal time only because the office 
pays him for it . . . Y.U.H.S.B. students turn out en 
masse for the rally opposing sanctions against Israel 
. . . Press scores highest in state on Regents Scholar- 
ship test and wins a Merit Scholarship — Big deal, 
anyone with an I.Q. running into four digits could 
have done the same . . . ATTENTION : Club period 
called off this Sunday, all seniors are to report to the 
auditorium for brainwashing — Dean Guterman and 
Rabbi Zuroff argue the good points of Y.U.H.S.B. 
and Y.U 

Mr. Gold: What are you writing for your next 

composition? 

Student: I'm writing about my life. 

Mr. Gold: Oh! A tragedy. 
Mr. Gee-Oo-Ell-Dee prepares us for our English 
Regent and throws in a little psychoanalysis on the 
side . . . College Boards — Regents — Graduation — 
We have survived the pains of growth and now go 
out into the world proudly joining the ranks of those 
who call themselves alumni of Y.U.H.S.B.B.B. 
(B.T.A. between friends). 







.)e% .'^ 



An end . . . and a beginning 



41 



New York State Scholarships 




onors 



A Ian Balsam 
Isaac Blachor 
Philip Bursky 
Daniel Primmer 
Aaron Pruchter 
Alan Hyman 
Ira Kellman 
Arnold Kreger 
Morton Leibowitz 
Joshua Levy 
Harvey Mandel 
Frederick Nathan 
*Mark Press 
Stanley Sussman 
Myron Zinaman 

*Also State Science Scholarship 



National Merit Scholarship Corporation 

Merit Scholarship 

Mark Press 



General Motors Scholarship Program 

Certificate of Merit 

Mark Press 



Mayor's Committee Award 

To The Student Who Ranks Highest In His High School Studies 

Mark Press 



42 



ACTIVITIES 




-J 



43 




Left to right. Seated: J. Levy, M. Zinaman, M. Strobel, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer P. Bursky, President H. Farkas, Vice-President 
A. Balsam, B. Weinstock, S. Ganchrow, S. Grossbard. Standing: 
N. Dershowitz, H. Leibowitz, C. Adier, D. Goldmacher, M. 
Pollack, M. Wolff, M. Wolf, S. Stein, M. Stern, S. Rubin, D. 
Kaplan. S. Gurewitsch, A. Flamholz, D. Epstein. 



OUR General Organization, the central agency 
of student government, also serves as the 
coordinator of Y.U.H.S.B.'s numerous extra-cur- 
ricular activities. This year increased student partic- 
ipation and interest enabled the G.O. to carry out 
one of the most successful programs in Y.U.H.S.B. 
history. 

The fall term saw Hershel Farkas elected G.O. 
President and Alan Balsam Vice-President. Other 
officers elected were Philip Bursky as Secretary- 
Treasurer, Alan Kezsbom as Debating Manager, 
and Martin Hochman as Athletic Manager. 

In the spring term Ira Kellman assumed the 
presidency while Myron Zinaman won a close vice- 
presidential race. Azriel Feiner was elected Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Paul Stein became Debating Mana- 
ger, and Martin Hochman was re-elected Athletic 
Manager. 



tall 



term 





44 



Left to right: Vice-President A. Balsam, Faculty Adviser J. 
Strum, Secretary-Treasurer P. Bursky, President H. Farkas. 




Although the G.O.'s accomplishments this year 
were many, there are certain events which stand out 
in our memories. 

Our successful assembly program contained such 
assemblies as a Freshman Orientation and Awards 
assembly, the Arista induction, several inter-scho- 
lastic debates, an open Student Council meeting, a 
debate preceding the Eisenhower-Stevenson na- 
tional elections, a rally before the M.J.H.S.L. 
basketball playoffs, and an assembly commemo- 
rating the ninth year of Israel's independence. The 
G.O. also sponsored very enjoyable Chanukah and 





spring term 



Left to right, Seated: S. Sussman, M. Leibowitz, H. Farkas, 
Secretary-Treasurer A. Feiner, President I. Kellman, Vice- 
President M. Zinaman. B. Weinstock, S. Stein. B. Adler. 
Standing: H. Fruchter, M. Meshenberg, M. Wolff, D. Levine. 
K. Prager, A. Wolfisli, D. Kaplan, K. Klein. B. Beer. N. Reiss. 
D. Lazar, IVI. Mednick, A. Flamholz. 



Purim Chagigas. Amusing programs were pre- 
sented by the Entertainment Commission and re- 
freshments were served. An innovation in the 
annual pre-election assembly was a forum in which 
the candidates expressed their views on different 
aspects of student government. 



45 



The G.O.'s annual affairs proved to be very 
successful. These included the Chagigas, the Lag 
B'Omer outing, Variety Nite, and numerous ath- 
letic events. Each of these attracted more students 
than at any other time in Y.U.H.S.B. history, and 
this fact helped the G.O. realize its best year finan- 
cially. 

Student interest in the club program was in- 
creased in the spring term by the formation of 
two new clubs, a Radio Club which set up an 
amateur radio station and a Stamp Club. 





Left to right: Faculty Adviser J. Strum, 
Secretary-Treasurer A. Feiner, President I. 
Kellman. Vice-President M. Zinaman. 



Y.U.H.S.B. proved itself to be a top school ath- 
letically in the many tournaments sponsored by 
the Inter- Yeshiva High School Student Council. We 
took first place awards in track and handball and a 
second place award in swimming. 

Our school was also a member of the Y.U.A.A., 
which sponsors the Metropolitan Jewish High 
School League. Y.U.H.S.B. was first in Brooklyn 
and tied for second in the League. 



-^^ 




46 



[STUDENT COURTj 




full term 



Left to right: S. Siissman, J. Ness. 
Chief Justice M. Press. P. Bursky, 
J. Levy, Alternate N. Nusbacher. 



OUR school's policy of letting the students gov- 
ern their own affairs is best illustrated by 
the Student Court. This organ of the G.O. allows 
students accused of misdemeanors to plead their 
cases before, and be judged by, fellow students. 

The five Student Court Justices and one alternate 
are elected by the Student Council. These Justices 
then elect from among themselves a Chief Justice. 
A student summoned to appear is prosecuted by 
the Captain of the Service Squad and may speak in 
his own behalf or may choose a spokesman for 
himself. The Student Court will then discuss his 
case and acquit or sentence him as it decides. The 
sentences range from essay writing to detention for 
minor offenses and may lead to suspension for 
more serious violations. 

Chief Justices were Mark Press, fall term, and 
William Golub, spring term. Mr. Strum serves as 
faculty advisor. 



spring term 



Left to right: H. Farkas. 
S. Sussman, Chief Justice 
W. Golub. B. Adler. B. 
Weinstock, Alternate M. 
Press. 





i all term 



Left to right. Front Row: N. Finkiel, J. Tager, Captain B. Adler, Vice-President A. Balsam, 
Captain M. Zinaman, P. Friedman, J. Tesler. Second Row: M. Feldman, M. Hochberg, D. 
Levine, J. Rapaport, D. Gold, W. Golub, A. Rosner. Third Row: J. Feuer, P. Kravit, M. 
Liebman, M. Meshenberg, M. Kellman, J. Schnure, S. Stein. Fourth Row: I. Blachor, A. 
Feiner, L. Rosen, O. Klapper, J. Pamess, L. Padwa, M. Galun, P. Stein. 




SERVICE SQUAD 



THE Service Squad, the law enforcement arm of 
* the CO., has as its function the maintenance 
of efficient student government. It operates in co- 
operation with the Student Court to maintain 
general decorum and to help keep our school clean. 
Students accused by a Service Squad member of 
violating a school rule are tried by the Student 
Court. 

In the fall term the Service Squad was headed 
by two Co-Captains and three Lieutenants, ap- 
pointed by, and responsible to, the Vice-President 
of the G.O. During the spring term the squad was 
re-organized and had only two Co-Captains. 



48 



Because of the growth of our school the Service 
Squad has played an increasingly important part 
in student government. This year's forty members 
were selected from over one hundred and fifty 
applicants. In this way each class was fairly repre- 
sented and high standards were maintained. 

Special thanks should be given to Bernard Adler 
and Myron Zinaman, fall term Captains, and 
Frederick Nathan and Jack Ness, spring term 
Captains. It is due to their effective leadership that 
the Service Squad has done such a fine job this 
year. Credit is also due the squad members for 
their sincere and conscientious efforts. Their work 
has been invaluable to Y.U.H.S.B. 




Left to right, Front Row; L. Belsky, B. Pallant, D. Jacobson, K. Prager, R. Gerstl, D. Kaplan, 
H. Tanowitz. Second Row: J. Zinaman, A. Marcus, Captain F. Nathan, Vice-President M. 
Zinaman, Captain J. Ness, J. Sussman, B. Hulkower, G. Wolf. Third Row: M. Wolf, S. Feigel- 
stock, C. Adler, H. Fischer, S. Piller, H. Mezei, G. Halpern, M. Bursky, J. Frost. Fourth Row: 
G. Pollack, A. Tallant, L. Laddin, S. Grossberg, J. Werblowsky, M. Weiss, H. Peine, A. Wolfish. 
Fifth Row: J. Karash, M. Mednick, D. Siegfried, M. Wachstock, G. Salzman, B. Sirote, E. 
Shuman, D. Goldkrantz, A. Cohen, I. Sheinman. 



spring 



term 




49 




nite 



Lejt to right: S. Ganchrow, A. Mandel, B. Hulkower. D. Zomick, 
Gober. N. Nusbacher. 



VARIETY Kite's fifth annual performance was 
held this year in the Walt Whitman Audito- 
rium. Its unprecedented success was due mainly to 
the leadership of Phil Frost and Saul Ganchrow 
and to the invaluable aid of four Y.U.H.S.B. grad- 
uates, Larry Arberman. who provided a comic 
interlude. Howard Burg, who accompanied several 
acts on the piano. Martin Rubenstein. who sang 
some folk songs, and Hal Udewitz. who M.C.'d the 
show. 

Besides the alumni many talented underafiftd- 
uates al^^performed. David ZoQ«^pla#?l a 
fymphony, Raptigel Blotk'^^JSivK^sl^ia 
I preser 






Philip Frost 



50 



Henry Belman, Marvin Leibman, Shimon Rubin, 
and Morton Waldman joined with Frost for vocal 
selections as a quintet. The Y.U.H.S.B. band, fea- 
turing Ira Gober on the accordion, Benjamin 
Hulkower on the drums, Noel Nusbacher on the 
saxophone, and David Zomick at the piano also 
livened up the show. 

As always, the highlight of the evening was a 
cantata. This year's presentation was entitled "Free- 
dom Cantata." It was very ably conducted by P. 
Frost and was thoroughly enjoyed by all present. 

The proceeds from the sale of Variety Nite 
tickets went to the G.O. and constituted a major 
source of income for the year. 





Left to right: S. Rubin, P. Frost, M. Leibman, H. Belman, M. Waldman. 




^"'*e« 



y. 0. c. 




M. Press, Y.O.C. chairman, learns at Mishmar. 



52 




THIS past year has seen the organization of all 
of Y.U.H.S.B.'s religious activities under one 
body, the Yeshiva Organization Commission. These 
activities include the Minyan, the Mishmar, and the 
Kashruth Committee. The Minyan, our morning 
prayer group, met every weekday morning under 
the leadership of Mark Press. The Mishmar, headed 
by Frederick Nathan, was held each Thursday night 
and an attendance of fifty to sixty students was not 
unusual. Led by Eli Shuman the Kashruth Com- 
mittee checked the kashruth of all foods sold in 
Y.U.H.S.B. 

Under the guidance of Rabbi Yogel the various 
committees expanded their activities to encourage 
"Yiddishkeit" in our school. As a result of this, 
group religious observances in our yeshiva reached 
an all-time high which, it is hoped, will be topped 
in the years to come. 



KOLENU, Y.U.H.S.B.'s annual Hebrew maga- 
zine, is now finisiiing its ninth year of publica- 
tion. Its theme this year was religious philosophy 
and ethics, "Ahavath Israel" (love of Israel), the 
Diaspora, and the Torah. At the same time the 
editors continued to feature stories on extra-cur- 
ricular activities around the school such as the 
Chanukah Chagiga and the Kashruth Commission. 
As has been done in the past the editors, when 
suggesting topics, stressed the importance of the 
individual's own experiences. The purpose of this 
was to make for greater originality and range of 
style. 

Kolenu has achieved great recognition among 
Jewish scholars and is well known in American 
Jewish circles and in Israel. Rabbi Epstein, whose 
guidance has led to Kolenu's phenomenal develop- 
ment, sees a very bright future for Y.U.H.S.B.'s 
celebrated Hebrew publication. 




Kolenu 




Left to right, Front Row: Editor-in-Chief 
N. Kahan, Faculty Adviser Rabbi J. D. 
Epstein, Editor-in-Chief J. Grossman. 
Back Row; J. Rapaport, A. Gottesman. 



53 




r^ 



TOPICS 




IN the four years since Y.U.H.S.B.'s student voice, 
The Topics, changed from a photo-offset to a 
printed newspaper, great advances have been made. 
Not only has the circulation grown, but many 
improvements have been made in journalistic style 
and news coverage. 

Several new features were added this year, in- 
cluding "All About T.A., "Views and Previews," 
and a poetry corner. The Topics received a second 
place rating in the Columbia Scholastic Press Asso- 
ciation contest for 1956. 

Published by the Journalism Club, The Topics 
was headed this year by Morris Zauderer, Editor- 
in-Chief. Mr. Sidney Gold, faculty adviser, has 
guided The Topics throughout its period of expan- 



Left to right, Seated: S. Stein, A. Kezsbom, B. Weinstock, Faculty 
Adviser S. Gold, Editor-in-Chief M. Zauderer, M. Press, J. Ness, 
S. Sussman. Standing: D. Epstein, A. Berman, A. Flamholz, A. 
Feiner, S. Sussman, M. Leibowitz, B. Adler, S. Stein, I. Kellman. 






fS 'CS 



y } 



ilulfll 



54 





Left to right: F. Nathan, D, Epstein, Editor-in-Chief J. Ne.ss, H. Goodman. 



Bulletin 



STARTED five terms ago a.s a supplement to The 
Topics, the Topics Bulletin took on added 
importance this year. 

By publishing comprehensive editorials through- 
out the year dealing with controversial and informa- 
tional topics, it gave the students a better under- 
standing of school activities. This was done in 
conformity with its recently adopted motto, "Vox 
populi omnia vincit," or "The will of the people 
always prevails," 

The Bulletin has also aided many school func- 
tions. It printed a list of cheers for our basketball 
team and conducted a successful and enlightening 
poll on the nationwide elections. Besides the 
opinion of the students the Bulletin solicited, re- 
ceived, and published statements from the candi- 
dates for the national presidency. 

Edited this year by Jack Ness, the Bulletin has 
accomplished its original purpose, namely, to 
provide both a weekly roundup of school news and 
a means of communication between the G.O. 
administration and the student body. 




55 




Lefl to right: M. Pollack, M. 
Shapiro, Chief Librarian H. 
Goodman, A. Rosenberg, A. 
Eagle, A. Wolfish, H. Liebman. 



THE English Library has expanded greatly since 
its inception. In the past few years the number 
of books available to the student body has more 
than doubled. The library boasts of a new and 
complete reference section, having twenty-one com- 
plete encyclopedias, four book digests, and twenty 
lexicons in five languages. Among the other new 
additions are current best sellers and many books 
on science and mathematics. The response of the 
students to the vast improvement in the quality and 
quantity of books found on the library shelves has 
been most gratifying. More books have been bor- 
rowed this year than ever before. 

This upsurge in student interest is also due to 
the work of the library's own publication, the 
"Library Journal." 

Under the direction of Chief Librarians Henry 
Goodman and Noel Nusbacher, the library staff 
was busy this year processing the many new books. 
Supervising all library activities was Mr. Ben 
Brender. faculty adviser. 




Left to right: M. Agulnek, B. Lanter, D. Kaplan, M. Strahlberg, S. Stein, 1. 
Haas, N. Nusbacher. A. Berman, J. Schnure, B. Hulkower, 1. Gober, N. Kahan. 



56 




THE Hebrew Library came into existence in 
1951 with approximately 200 books, but it has 
since grown to a collection of over 2500 volumes, 
most of which came from the collection of the late 
Rabbi Leventhal, former Chief Rabbi of Philadel- 
phia. In the past year many new books have been 
acquired through the generosity of the Adminis- 
tration, including the Aruch, the Mishnah Torah, 
and several sets of Mishnayot. 




ARY 



Hebrew 



^ 




Left to right: J. Werblowsky, I. Handel, S. Kaplan, Faculty Adviser Rabbi J. 
D. Epstein, A. Kezsbom, A. Gottesman, J. Wolf, Chief Librarian N. Reiss, 
M. Sokal, N. Kahan, Chief Librarian J. Grossman. F. Nathan. 



Under the direction of Rabbi J. D. Epstein, the 
library staff is busy cataloguing the new acquisi- 
tions and preparing them for student use. 

The Hebrew Library Book Agency, under the 
direction of L Handel, makes available to the 
students s'forim, tzitsis, and other religious articles 
at greatly reduced prices. 




57 



flRISIfl 



ARISTA, Y.U.H.S.B.'s honor society, offers rec- 
ognition to students who have excelled in 
both their Hebrew and secular studies. Academic 
excellence, extra-curricular participation, and ap- 
proval by both Arista members (Assembly) and a 
faculty committee (Senate) are the prerequisites 
for admission. This year the membership of Arista 
reached a total of thirty-five. 

Arista's purpose is twofold. First, it offers recog- 
nition to those students whom it deems worthy. 
Secondly, Arista helps the student body through its 
coaching program which offers, to any student 
requesting it, aid in his weak subjects. 



Clockwise from foreground to center. Seated: B. Adler. B. Reiss. A. Fruchter. M. Strahlberg 
B. Pallant, L. Greenfield. Vice-Leader M. Zinaman, Leader M. Press, Secretary-Treasurer S 
Weiser, N. Nusbacher, H. Farkas, J. Levy, S. Sussman, N. Reiss, A. Balsam. Standing: A. Hyman 
H. Goodman, B. Weinstock, M. Mednick. D. Siegfried. S. Schechter. M. Strobel. P. Stein. H 
Mandel. P. Bursky, S. Goldman, J. Grossman. 





58 




Left to right, Seated: A. Kezsbom, Vice-Leader M. Strobel, Leader B. Weinstock, Faculty 
Adviser S. H. Leibowitz, Secretary-Treasurer H. Mandel, N. Kahan. Standing: H. Belman, A. 
Rosenberg, A. Flamholz, C. Cantor, R. Bloch. 




This year, as in the past, new members were 
officially inducted into Arista at special assemblies. 
At each of these, one in the fall and one in the 
spring, the inductees received Arista pins and 
certificates and took the Arista oath. Arista's offi- 
cers during the fall term were Mark Press, Leader; 
Myron Zinaman, Vice-Leader; and Sheldon Weiser, 
Secretary-Treasurer. The spring term officers were 
Barnet Weinstock, Leader; Martin Strobel, Vice- 
Leader; and Harvey Mandel, Secretary-Treasurer. 
Mr. Samuel H. Lebowitz has served as Arista's 
faculty adviser since its inception. 



59 




Left to right: E. Lowenstein, R. Bloch, N. Nusbacher, M. Mednick. 1. Kellman, A. Hynian, 
Debating Manager A. Kezsbom, M. Strobel, M. Zinaman, B. Adler, A. Balsam. 



fall term 




DEB A 



DEBATING is one of the most important extra- 
curricular activities in Y.U.H.S.B. Intra-mural 
debating affords the participants invaluable expe- 
rience in public expression. The inter-class debates 
take place in two leagues — the Junior League, 
including terms one to four, and the Senior League, 
including terms five through eight. The school 
championship is decided at the term's end by a 
contest between the Junior and Senior League 
winners. 




60 



Our School Debating Team participated in six- 
teen inter-scholastic debates, more than ever before, 
and compiled an impressive record. For the first 
time several debates were held with schools other 
than yeshivoth, including Stuyvesant, Columbia 
Grammar, and Rhodes High Schools. The team was 
led by Alan Kezsbom, fall term Debating Manager, 
and Paul Stein, spring term Debating Manager. 

A Public Speaking Club, under the guidance of 
Mr. M. Turetsky, functions as a training ground 
for future debaters. Interest in debating was further 
stimulated by a series of assemblies during the year 
at which forums and inter-school debates were 
featured. 




TING 



spring term 



Left to right: A. Kezsbom, M 
Zinaman, S. Grossbard, R. Bloch, N 
Dershowitz, H. Belman, J. Neufeld 
Debating Manager P. Stein, A. Feiner 
A. Balsam, A. Hyman. 




61 




VARSITY 

basketball 



VARSITY basketball is by far the most popular 
of Y.U.H.S.B.'s extra-curricular activities. 
Coached again this season by Abbe Gewirtz, our 
basketball quintet tied with R.J.J, for second place 
in the Metropolitan Jewish High School League 
playoffs. 

Aside from the twelve League games in which 
we participated, we also played games against 
Brooklyn Friends (twice), Rhodes (twice), Colby 
Academy, and the Y.U.H.S.B. alumni. 

After losing the season's opener to Y.U.H.S. by 
a score of 63-49, we came back to win the next 
five League games, all by a close score, before 
again bowing to Y.U.H.S. From then until the end 
of the regular season we lost only once, to R.J.J. , 
in the final seconds of the game by a score of 58-55. 



C^ 



Left to right, Front Row: H. Fruchter, M. Hoch- 
man, H. Lemer, H. Yoskowitz, J. Leibowitz. 
Second Row; Manager J. Tager, D. Primmer, 
M. Kaplan, D. Levine, M. Ostrow, M. Waldman, 
Manager M. Lebowitz. Third Row: I. Blachor, 
Captain H. Farkas, J. Lifschitz, S. Kramer. 



62 



ilL. 




Season's Record 




49 


Rhodes 


65 


55 


Alumni 


44 


52 


Rhodes 


67 


49 


Y.U.H.S.* 


63 


57 


Chaim Berlin* 


49 


50 


Colby 


70 


56 


Ramaz* 


53 


49 


R.J .J.* 


45 


51 


Flatbush* 


50 


49 


H. I.L.I. * 


43 


41 


Y.U.H.S.* 


52 


61 


Brooklyn Friends 


11 


55 


Ramaz* 


46 


70 


Brooklyn Friends 


90 


55 


R.J.J.* 


58 


79 


Chaim Berlin* 


52 


66 


Flatbush 


56 


59 


H.LL.L* 


51 


53 


R.J.J.** 


74 


1056 


\/l. 


1105 


•'League Game )>^ 


7 


■'*Pla 


yoflF Game / '/ 






Leading Scorers 




Farkas 


460 


Kramer 


221 


Hochman 


108 


Lifschitz 


67 


Lerner 


62 




H. Farkas, Varsity Captain, and M. Hochman. School Athletic Manager. 

The high for any one game was set by Hesh 
Farkas, who scored 44 points against Chaim 
Berlin, thus setting a new record. Farkas also estab- 
Hshed a new scoring record for an individual ball- 
player by tallying 460 points during the 1956-57 
season. 

In the third annual All-Star Game Y.U.H.S.B. 
was represented by Coach Abbe Gewirtz, who 
piloted the Brooklyn team. Hesh Farkas. Shelly 
Kramer, and Joe Lifschitz. 

Special thanks should be given to the team man- 
agers Philip Friendman and Joel Tager. 




63 




Left to right, Seated: D. Goldmacher, J. 
Rapaport, L. Haspel, N. Dershowitz, J. 
Werblowsky, M. Nathanson, H. Goldkrantz. 
Standing: S. Sussman, H. Leibowitz, I. 
Feigenblum, J. Goldman, A. Flamholz, L. 
Rosen, D. Lazar, Athletic Manager M. 
Hochman. 



UNHAMPERED as in the past by the lack of an 
official coach and the suitable facilities, the 
Junior Varsity carried through an extensive pro- 
gram during the past season. 

With a former Varsity ballplayer, Marv Hir- 
schorn, as coach and with the added use of the 
George Wingate High School gymnasium, the J.V. 
enjoyed its most successful season. Led in scoring 
by T. Dershowitz and J. Werblowsky, the J.V. 
rolled to an impressive 8-4 record. 

Among the numerous games played by the J.V. 
this season, were two with the Monarchs, one with 
the Sages, and a game with the Prophets. The latter 
saw Josh Werblowsky score 19 points, a high for 
any single game. This year the J.V. took its first 
step towards establishing itself as one of the most 
important extra-curricular activities of Y.U.H.S.B. 
It is hoped that it will continue with its extensive 
program in the coming season. 



Leading Scorers 

T. Dershowitz 
J. Werblowsky 
M. Nathanson 




64 



INTRAMURAL 



As has been our practice in the past, an exten- 
sive intramural athletic program was planned 
and put into effect in the 1956-1957 season. 

The schedule called for inter-class competition 
in slapball, basketball, handball, ping-pong, foul- 
shooting, and Softball in both the fall and spring 
terms. The season's highlight occurred at the annual 
Lag B'Omer outing where the championship soft- 
ball game was played. An innovation this year was 
a junior-senior football game. 

The intramural program serves an important 
function, for through its keen competition it molds 
a strong class spirit and gives each student a chance 
to participate in the sport he desires to. 




Winners in Intramural Competition 1956-1957 



Basketball — 7A Ping-Pong — M. Lebowitz 

Foulshooting— 5B Slapball (fall)— 7A 

Handball — M. Hochman Slapball (spring) — 43 



K. Tuchman and L. Laddin vie in a game of knock-hockey. 





65 






■THIS year has seen more participation in inter- 
■ scholastic competition by Y.U.H.S.B. teams 
than ever before. For the first time since its incep- 
tion the Tennis Team has competed in scheduled 
matches while the Swimming, Track, and Chess 
Teams have greatly expanded their schedules. 




N its second year, our Tennis Team, coached by 
S. Hoffman, participated in three scheduled 
meets. The first of the three against our Uptown 
brothers resulted in a 2-2 tie. The next match was 
lost by a 4-2 score to the Y.U.J.V. while in the last 
match against B'klyn Friends, our opponents tri- 
umphed by a 3-1 score. Captain of the team, 
Bernard Adler, voiced an opinion that future pros- 
pects for this sport in Y.U.H.S.B. are unlimited. 



Li.jt to right. Front Row: Captain B. 
Adler, M. Zauderer, D. Frimmer. Second 
Row: M. Zinaman, P. Bursky. Third 
Row: A. Hyman, O. Klapper. 



66 




OLDEST and most active of our minor teams, 
the Chess Team under the leadership of Larry 
Greenfield, Captain, amassed a 2-2 record for the 
year. Beating Flatbush and R.J.J, by scores of 4-1 
and 3-2 respectively, they bowed to M.T.A. AV2 to 
V2 and Torah Vodaath 5-0. Consisting in a large 
part of lower classmen we are sure the chess team 
will improve on their record in years to come. 




Left to right, Seated: J. Tesler, Captain L. Greenfield, 
A. Fruchter. Standing: P. Bursky, S. Sussman. 



nV, 




Left to right: J. Neufeld, A. Fruchter, H. Leibowitz. 

OUR Swimming Team, captained by Joe 
Lifschitz and consisting of five members, was 
prevented from completing a highly successful sea- 
son by many difficulties. After placing second in 
the first meet of the year, they were unable to 
participate in the remaining three meets when the 
stars, Lifschitz and Farkas, both were injured. Suc- 
ceeding years will undoubtedly show an increase in 
interest in this sport as our team achieves greater 
success. 



OUR ten-member Track Team, captained by 
Joel Schnure, captured top honors in its first 
meet this year by beating out our Uptown rivals 
by one point and far outdistancing the other five 
teams. Mr. Schnure expressed his conviction that 
our next season would be even more successful than 
the present one. 

Lejt to right: H. Farkas, Captain J. Lifschitz. 




67 




ro-op 



^7 



MORE successful this year than in any other 
year in its history, the Co-op Store, under 
the direction of Ira Kellman and Steven Goldman, 
has established itself on a sound economic basis. 

The Co-op moved to new and large quarters in 
the fall term for the greater convenience of student 
customers. It is G.O. sponsored, and its main pur- 
pose is to enable students to get their school 
supplies, appliances, and other items at greatly 
reduced prices. The Co-op is but another example 
of students running their own affairs for the benefit 
of all. 




Left to right: C. Adier, M. Wangrofsky, N. Dershowitz, 
P. Singer, Manager S. Goldman, D. Goldmacher, Mana- 
ger I. Kellman, A. Feiner, D. Lazar, O. Klapper. 



S. Goldman, Co-op Manager, waits on customer. 




68 





.•^^sgg^ 



a^.LX u .jt .t i t. 








69 



Fame 



by PERRY KRAVIT 



Struggling, hoping, praying all the time. 
Going from place to place. 
Pleading, begging, asking all the time, 
"Is there no end to this pace?" 

Walking, traveling, trying constantly. 
Even changing his name. 
So discouraged, crying constantly, 
"How can I achieve fame?" 

Then all at once, a start in a play 
An actor's dream come true. 
And from that very part in a play 
Many more parts ensue. 

His goal's achieved, but now the great star 
Does not see things the same. 
Scorning those who helped create the star 
Is his response to fame. 

Do not spurn the friends who helped you find 
The path that gained fame's crown. 
For they're the ones you'll also find 
When you're on your way down. 





I PEACE 




Tomorrow there will be peace; 
Today he waits, vigilant, like a beacon by the water 
He stands searching the night, never leaving. 
Tomorrow there will be peace; 

Today there is hatred, unendurable hatred — 
Hatred for the whole rotten mess. 
For the war, for the enemies. 
Tomorrow there will be peace; 



Today he eats with a gun. 
Sleeps with a gun. 
Kills with a gun or gets killed. 
Tomorrow there will be peace; 

Tomorrow is his dream, his hope. 
Tomorrow will come; 
Today he fights. 

by SHELDON WEISER 



71 




and ACCOMP 



by JOSEPH LIFSCHITZ 





THE American ideals of freedom and tolerance 
have given the Jews the opportunity for suc- 
cessful growth and development. The story of the 
part the Jew has played in the building of America 
starts not today, nor a hundred years ago, but in 
the year 1492. It began with a man who thought 
that the world was round and who had courage 
enough to prove it at the risk of his own life. We 
know him today as Christopher Columbus, the 
man who opened a new world for the oppressed 
and persecuted of all nations. Columbus did not 
hesitate to go to Jewish mapmakers for his charts 
and information, and to Jewish scientists for his 
facts. And it was not Isabella's jewels that 
financed the voyage of discovery but the money 
raised by a converted Jew, Luis de Santangel by 
name. 

In Spain for hundreds of years Jews lived in 
what is still remembered as a golden age. They 
produced scientists, scholars, poets, philosophers, 
and musicians. They helped make Spain famous 
for learning and culture. But by 1492 that golden 
age had long since come to an end. Ferdinand, 
King of Spain, culminated a long series of persecu- 
tions by ordering the Jews to either renounce their 
religion or leave Spain. Many became Christians 
but many more, three hundred thousand in all, 
chose to remain Jews and go into exile. 

Then Holland took possession of Brazil. Jews 
not only from Spain and Portugal, but from all 
over Europe, flocked there. For a brief time it 
seemed that all would be well for the Jews in 
Brazil. But in 1654 that hope vanished. The Portu- 
gese took Brazil from the Dutch and once more 



72 



LISHMENT 



the Jews had to flee for their lives. One small boat- 
load of them, after being captured by pirates and 
then rescued by a French man-of-war, reached the 
Dutch colony of New Amsterdam. In September, 
1654, they sailed into the harbor of this Dutch 
village, the first Jewish settlers in what was one 
day to become New York City. 

The Jews, although poverty-stricken refugees at 
the time of their landing, immediately set about 
establishing themselves as citizens of worth and 
usefulness. They developed an honorable reputa- 
tion among the Indians and their boats and barges 
journeyed far up the Hudson and Delaware Rivers. 
By 1683 they had rented a place to worship and 
in 1728 they undertook to build their first syna- 
gogue on Mill Street. They became persons of 
respect in the community, honored and trusted 
by both the Dutch and the English. As word of 
the wonderful new land reached Europe, more 
and more Jews sailed across the seas to America. 

At the beginning of the American Revolution 
there were about three thousand Jews in the Thir- 
teen Colonies. It is estimated that of these three 
thousand men, women and children, some three 
hundred at one time or another during the war 
fought in the militia or the regular army. Perhaps 
as important as any military service the Jews were 
able to contribute was the part they played in the 
financing of the Revolution. Outstanding was the 
work of Haym Salomon, a Polish Jew, who, 
charged by the British in New York with aiding 
and abetting the American cause, escaped from 
prison and fled to Philadelphia, where he devoted 
himself to the cause of the Revolution. 



In 1785 the population of the thirteen colonies 
was about three and one-half million; almost three 
thousand were Jews. In 1840 the population of 
the United States had increased to seventeen mil- 
lion, of whom fifteen thousand were Jews. Forty 
years later the population of America was some 
fifty million, of whom two hundred and fifty thou- 
sand were Jews. Today the population of the 
United States is one hundred and seventy million 
and almost five and one-half million are Jews. 
The reason for this remarkable increase and 
growth lies in the fact that the Jews in Europe were 
extremely poor and endlessly persecuted. Eco- 
nomically they were allowed to keep themselves 
alive but they were permitted little more. In 1881 
their lot became heavier than they could bear. 
Many Jews began to migrate to America. At first 
they moved slowly; the men went by themselves 
and then sent for their wives and children. The 
migration grew. Poor and rich they came, learned 
and unlearned, old and young. For five years, 
beginning with 1904, more than one hundred 
thousand of them came to America each year. 

To American Jews, their country and its ideals 
are precious because they have never taken them 
for granted. To them they embody the Promised 
Land, the actuality of freedom, of security, and of 
growth. The earlier immigration produced many 
loyal citizens; they were statesmen, writers, mer- 
chants, doctors, lawyers, and soldiers. But now 
the generations derived from the Jews of eastern 
Europe have added to these painters, poets, actors, 
playwrights, musicians, and scientists. They have 
brought their share, many authorities say more 
than their share, of enduring excellence to the 
spiritual and cultural life of the country. 




73 



Zkis Piece 
ofClay 

by ISAAC CANTOR 



A little piece of common clay. 
In wondrous human form, 
A loving child has come to stay, 
A mother's heart to warm. 

And lisping lips soon learn to talk. 
The song of life to sing. 
And little feet soon learn to walk, 
A wondrous little thing. 

Some teach their children with a rod. 
Some teach them with a smile. 
Some with an understanding nod — 
But teach them all the while. 

Some give their children daily bread. 
Some feed the mind alone. 
Some heap upon them gold — or lead — 
And some build hearts of stone. 

The little habits it will form 

Its likes and dislikes too 

The hopes and fears that round it swarm 

They most depend on you. 

So mold this piece of common clay. 
Its heart and mind and soul; 
Your child will see a greater day 
A nd reach a worthy goal. 



(Headline in the New York Times, Nov. 6 
ONE DOLLAR AN ACRE") 



. "LUNA ON SALE! ONLY 



IT is a crisp November day. Mr. E. Johnson, a 
small middle-aged man with the drawn features 
and leathery skin of the outdoor laborer and wear- 
ing a shabby suit and a somewhat worn Homburg, 
enters the offices of Moonbeam Estates, Inc. and 
looks about nervously. He is approached by an 
affably smiling salesman. 

"Ah, good morning, Sir. Beautiful day on Earth. 
What can we do for you?" 

"Well, I seen your ad in the paper and I thought 
maybe, uh . . ." 

"Certainly, Sir. The moment you came in the 
door I knew you were a man of vision. Now if 
you'll just step over to this counter, I'll be glad 
to show you some pictures of our choicest prop- 
erties." 

"Well, uh, I'd kinda like to know something 
about the, uh, the place before I, uh . . ." 

"Happy to answer any questions. Any questions 
at all, Mr. — Mr. — " 

"Johnson. Ezra I. Johnson. The little woman 
and me was sorta thinking of picking up a few 
acres and building a place. We been talking about 
moving to the suburbs and we thought maybe 
this . . ." 

"Couldn't make a wiser choice, Mr. Johnson. 
Just the spot, for instance, for sports. On the 
Moo-uh, Luna, you get winter and summer sports, 
both right in your own backyard and both within 
twenty-eight days. You get summer every four- 
teen days and winter every fourteen nights. 
Couldn't ask for anything handier could you?" 

"Sounds real good. But I was thinking about 
fishing. I'm a man who likes to fish on vacations. 
Only I was told they don't have water on your 
property. 

"Nonsense, Mr. Johnson! Where there's fish 
you'll find water. Isn't that true?" 

"Fine, fine! I'm certainly relieved to hear that. 
... I was also kinda wondering about how the 
climate is up there. Now like here in town, all 
these fumes and chemicals in the air, a person can 
get all sortsa lung trouble and . . ." 



FOR SAii 



by HARVEY KURITZKY 



n 



"No worries there, Mr. Johnson. On Luna 
you'll find only the rarest type of atmosphere. 
Why, Sir, we guarantee you won't be able to smell 
a thing." 

"Certainly sounds good. . . . Now there's the 
matter of shopping. To the little woman that's real 
important you know." 

"Mr. Johnson, you're a man who thinks of 
everything! Let me assure you that by the time 
you get your little nest built, there'll be plenty 
of stores to take care of all your wants." 

"How about improvements bein' in? Ya know, 
like paved streets and sewers and electricity and 
phone service — stuff like that there?" 

"Well, Sir, I know that you'll want to have all 
that in your new place, so let me put it this way. 
For the driving you'll be doing you'll find the 
streets and highways more than adequate. Every 
sewer and public utility that goes in will be 
negligible as far as you're concerned, don't worr}' 
about that. . . . Now suppose we put you down for 
twenty acres? . . . Just sign here, Mr. Johnson." 
"Thank you Mr. Johnson, that will be just fine. 
And now perhaps you'd be interested in some ad- 
ditional property. We've got an excellent buy on 
the Brooklyn Bridge. ..." 



\ 



75 \ 




Moly 



TO A 



THE State of Israel was born in a bitter struggle, 
and raised with ail the hardships of war. The 
blood of her martyrs still reddens the sandy earth 
and the noise of terrifying battle still echoes in her 
ancient canyons. And what is the nation's prime 
example of its trials and tragedies, its festivals 
and feasts? Surely none other than "The Great 
Rock," the capital city of Jerusalem. 

The main road to Jerusalem is not, like many 
of its geographical brothers, an ancient one. It 
was paved during the War for Freedom, ten 
years ago. It winds up high hills, surrounded by 
steep and historically famous mountains. On both 
sides the terrain is thick with trees, and none can 
miss seeing the dead hulks of trucks lying on 
their sides. These same skeletons were once 
vehicles driven under fire to bring supplies to a 
besieged Jerusalem. Some made it — these didn't. 
These have become a symbol of the struggle of the 
nation. 



One gains altitude as he approaches the great 
city. Large signs are seen everywhere at the gates 
— "Beruchim Habaim" — blessed are they who 
come! The famous road becomes main street, 
bustling with activity, where one hears a jargon of 
thirty foreign tongues. With the evening comes 
peaceful silence and few automobile horns break 
the stillness in the air. One retires with the com- 
plete acceptance of this peace, and yet no sooner 
does his head hit the pillow when that tense still- 
ness is broken by the sharp report of a machine- 
gun. The burst lasts only for seconds, and yet, it 
is but the beginning. Not until dawn does the in- 
termittent firing cease, and the foreigner can re- 
turn to undisturbed slumber. 

If one takes a short walk, he may come across, 
not far from the border, the famous and highly 
controversial section of "Meah Shearim," the 
"hundred gates." Here the culturally minded tour- 
ist finds an area populated by the extremely 




76 



BILLION PEOPLE 



by RAPHAEL BLOCH 



orthodox elements of traditional Jewry. While the 
world on the outside advanced to more liberal and 
practical customs, progress seems to have skipped 
over this stronghold, and the picturesque inhabi- 
tants live much the same as their forefathers did 
a thousand years ago. One cannot help but be im- 
pressed by the sight of figures with long earlocks 
and clothed in uncomfortable-looking black coats 
who seem to be perpetually trudging back and 
forth through the narrow alleys from home to 
synagogue. The citizens are famous for the kind 
hospitality which they show to the needy. How- 
ever, they do not hesitate to impose with violence 
their opinions on others who are not quite as 
zealous as they. Any sympathy which a tourist 
may have for their ideals is quickly tempered upon 
his observing them carrying out their threats. But, 
regardless of their activities, one cannot fail to 
have respect for their sincerity and devotion to 
their religion. 



No man's land, only about forty feet wide, is 
crawling with mines. As one approaches it, he 
cannot miss the signs "Sacanah-Hagvul" — danger, 
the border. The sun beats down mercilessly on the 
wretched land. Abandoned cabins sit and rot, 
miles of barbed wire rust and old foot-worn paths 
collect weeds. On one side cruises a green jeep 
with four soldiers and a heavy machine gun in- 
side. The men are dressed in khaki, and wear their 
characteristic berets. Forty feet away, there cruises 
a drab green jeep, with four soldiers and a heavy 
machine gun inside. An expert could not tell the 
two units apart, and yet, give them a chance, and 
they'll brutally murder each other. This famous 
city, too often familiar to the footsteps of armies, is 
familiar to them once more. The killing is the 
same, it always is — only the methods are different. 

In this atmosphere lives Jerusalem, holy to a 
billion people. She has survived the horrible past, 
may God protect her in the future. 




A-A-rtjL, 



ruP 



^STi 




77 



HE knew that he was dying. 
He could feel his heart beating through the 
gaping hole in his chest. With each pulse more of 
his blood spilled out on the brown sand. In a few 
minutes he would be dead, a lifeless corpse indis- 
tinguishable from a hundred others. 

The full impact of it suddenly struck him. Here 
he lay, a thousand miles from nowhere, a casualty 
in a gigantic chess game. Yes, that was it- — a chess 
game, in which he and countless others like him 
were only the merest pawns. He pitied the man 
who had to make the moves. 

His mind began to rack back over the events 
of the morning. . . . 

The loudspeaker was blaring "All hands on 
deck" as he started to get out of bed. In twenty 
minutes the whole ship had learned the news — by 
eleven o'clock the attack would begin. The enemy 
had turned the island into a fortress, and we had 
to get him out! 

They had landed all right, but they hadn't had a 
chance. The Japs were waiting like kids at a 



pigeon shoot. As soon as they hit the beach it had 
started. He hadn't even gotten to fire his gun — a 
well-placed grenade had seen to that. Those who 
were lucky dug in and those who weren't. . . . 

Only yesterday the letter he had been expecting 
arrived. Jane had said yes. The rest of that day 
he was up in the clouds planning for their wedding. 
How he wished this dirty war would end! 

THE LAST 

Well, there wasn't going to be any marriage 
now. He wondered how Jane would take the news 
of his death. And his parents — they'd probably get 
one of those rotten telegrams from the War De- 
partment. He hoped it wouldn't break his mother's 
heart. 

He thought of life before the war. He had just 
gotten out of college then, a major in philosophy. 
His parents had not attended the graduation and 
when he came home his father practically dis- 




78 



owned him. "Philosophy! An invention of the 
devil! Look what it has done to you!" That was 
always the case with these people when you upset 
their cherished beliefs. But for his mother's sake 
he tried, and an uneasy truce had prevailed for 
most of his stay. He had even gone to the syna- 
gogue on Saturday to make his father happy. But 
when it came to wearing phylacteries he drew the 



ACT 



by MARK PRESS 




line — he absolutely would not. His father got so 
red that he thought the old man would have a 
stroke. The next day his father ordered him out 
of the house. 

He remembered his youth in that little town in 
Illinois. After school each day he had gone to a 
"talmud torah." How he had hated it! Now he 
had freed himself of all the shackles of tradition. 
He was independent. He was modern. Suddenly he 
wished that the news would kill his father. 



A sharp pain recalled him to the present. He 
saw in the distance a chaplain administering the 
last rites and an unreasoning fear suddenly seized 
him. Suppose there was a G-d, suppose He really 
did punish sinners. He must make his peace with 
G-d. He had to call a chaplain, quickly, before it 
was too late. . . . 

"Hey, Charlie. C'mere. Here's another stiff. 
C'mon 'n help me thrown him in the wagon." 





OX DEATH 





Ask the wisest and he will admit his fear of death; 
For true wisdom is the attempt to search for the truth 
And the willingness to admit the one absolute truth. 
Ask the most valiant and he will not deny death 
For true bravery is the ability to face reality 
And the courage to admit the one undeniable reality 
The long unending sleep 
The supreme doubtless end 
Unpredictable, yet positively impending. 
All mortals fear death yet none know its secrets; 
Thus the fear of death is a blind fear 
Blind and inevitable, yet not unfounded 

For death is the unknown, and what is more fearful to mortals 
Than what our eyes cannot see and our brains cannot fathom. 
It shall remain so despite our wisdom 

For no man has tasted death and returned to give his opinion. 

by PAUL STEIN 



79 




THE night was cold and drizzly and I was walk- 
ing home from a belated appointment with the 
doctor. As I passed through one of the narrow- 
twisting side streets that I habitually used when 
hurrying home, an eerily-glowing object caught my 
eye. I bent down, picked it up, and found, to my 
astonishment, that it was a newspaper. Even more 
amazing was the dateline — March 15, 1977! 

One bold headline immediately attracted my 
attention — "'Secretary of State Wins Final Nobel 



Peace Prize." My curiosity aroused, I read on. The 
newly-crowned King of Sweden had just awarded 
Secretary Graves the 1977 Peace Prize. In his 
accompanying speech the King had praised the 
United States for its wonderful efforts on behalf 
of world peace. Amidst widespread applause Sec- 
retary Graves ascended the rostrum and presented 
the king with a check for three thousand dollars. 
Several graybeards in the audience still remem- 
bered that there had been a time when the recipient 
of the award received the money; however, that 
time had long since passed. Nowadays, the United 
States was the only country that spent money and 
it would have seemed ridiculous for the King to 
present Mr. Graves with a check. 

The article went on to enumerate the many ways 
in which America had striven to preserve world 




peace in the last fifteen years. In 1960 the United 
States purchased Russia and converted it into the 
world's largest winter vacationland for the ever- 
growing tourist trade. Six years later America, in 
the interests of peace, bought Hungary, Rumania, 
and Bulgaria, thus removing several stumbling- 
blocks in the path of international harmony. For 
this great service to humanity a Nobel Prize was 
also awarded. This year, the article went on to say, 
the United States is negotiating to buy Red China 
and make it into a huge hand laundry to service 
the entire world. 

The article concluded by stating that since 
America now owned the Earth and since the Prize 
was not awarded for preventing civil war, this 
would be the last time that such a presentation 
would be made. 




80 




^52.16-8^ . 17 S - i--:. ; 038 Anderson Av. I AvZ Bklyn. Room 30 9. 10 

ALL BRONX OFFIC 

iR^cepls. Clerks. Ekprs, Stc 
Swbd-Typist S60. Medical 
Office As.slsts (2) elect, tj 
f dtlr.n i.Conc. Agcy. 261 E 



COUNTRY CLUE SECT. — 2 1 

apt., G&E Incl.. S80. Bu, 

1 petsc-n. TY 2-2419. 



SEVERAL APIS. AVAIL. 

Bkr. 283 E. Kincsbggs Rd . \VE? -090f 
2 RMS., every mod. Impvt.. faces oark 

855.20. Supt. 1810 Tra:al.-^ar PI. 

3 ROOMS, IN BACK. PRIVATE 
HOUSE. CALL KI 7-4B16. 



3 RM,*?. — Carpeting, 2nri fl. K:a£Sbv'ge 
Ed S7 5 Alter 7 pm, WE 3-3 239. 

«~tARGE Modem Rms. — Giound f.bor. 
IRT Subway station, ofl park. Call 

} tu S P- W- LU 4-6910. 



ASST, BKKPE. — 9 to 5, 

cond., lower Bx, 
main acceptable, start $60 



CASHIER-SALES, PAF 

FOR HIGH-GRADE SHC 

CALL YONKERS 9 



CLERK^BLUE CROSS 
H.S. CTid., gd, at flgare.': 
liberal ijenefits. Apply Per 
JIOUNT SLNAI HOSP.. 1] 



-•- 




■Dstom built 
Ique lamps. 


OHICKiKING GRAt 
BXC. COND. 6-8 




FRENCH PROV. Spl 


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flr. sample. Sac D 


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r.y 8-7651. 


WANTED 


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AIM Antl-KiCJ 




CLERK— $50, to worl-: 

KnowledKe adding m 
JlCiraany Av.. Meadowbro 





or II S Y X A G O G r E s 



From . . . 

YOUNG ISRAEL OF WINDSOR PARK 

69-15 - 215th Street 
Bayside 64, N. Y. 



CONGREGATION SHOMREI EMUNAH 

5202 - 14th Avenue 
Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 



B'NAI ISRAEL OF LINDEN HEIGHTS 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Dr. Aaron Werthheim, Rabbi 
Joseph Samuels, President 
Morris Kertzer, Vice President 



CONGREGATION SCHARA TZEDECK 

3476 Oak Street 
Vancouver 9, British Columbia, Canada 



CONGREGATION ANSHEL OZORITZ 

885-87 Hopkinson Avenue 
Brooklyn 1 2, N. Y. 



FIRST CONGREGATION ANSHE SFARD 

4502 - 14th Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



WEST SIDE JEWISH CENTER 

347 West 34th Street 
New York, N. Y. 





\A 



Compliments of . . 



MR. AND MRS. JOEL H. ROSNER 



and 



ALEXANDER, FRANCES, 



AND ROBERT ROSNER 




83 



THE ARISTA SOCIETY OF 
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL OF BROOKLYN 

Congratulates 
THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1957 



OFFICERS, FALL TERM 
Leader, Mark Press 
Vice-Leader, Myron Zinaman 
Secretary, Sheldon Weiser 



OFFICERS, SPRING TERM 
Leacfer, Barnet Weinstock 
Vice-Leader, Martin Strobe! 
Secretory, Harvey Mandel 



Faculty Adviser, Mr. Samuel H. Lebowitz 




THE GENERAL ORGANIZATION OF 
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL OF BROOKLYN 

Congratulates 
THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1957 

OFFICERS, FALL TERM OFFICERS, SPRING TERM 

Hershel Farkas, President Ira Kellman, Presiderit 

Alan Balsam, Vice-President Myron Zinaman, Vice-President 

Philip Bursky, Secretary Treasurer Azriel Feiner, Secretary Treasurer 
Mr. Joseph B. Strum, Faculty Adviser 







84 



Congratulations to . . . 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1957 

from 

THE PARENT'S ASSOCIATION 



Mrs. A. B. Schnure, President 
Mrs. S. Cantor, Vice-President 
Mrs. A. S. Bursky, Treasurer 



Mrs. H. Meshenberg, Financial Secretary 
Mrs. N. Grossbard, Recording Secretary 
Mrs. A. Brumer, Corresponding Secrefory 



Comptiments of 



ELMHURST CREAM CO. INC. 

155-75 STYLER ROAD 
JAMAICA 33, N. Y. 

MILK AND DAIRY PRODUCTS 





Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 





THE GRADUATING CLASS 
OF 1957 



Class 2A 
Class 2B 
Class 2C 



from 

Class 4A 
Class 4B 
Class 4C 



Class 6A 
Class 6B 




86 





Congratulations to . 



ALAN BALSAM 

from 

Mom, Dad, Joel 

and 

All Your Aunts and Uncles 






87 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to 



AZRIEL FEINER 



Upon His Graduation 



from 



Mom and Dad 

Leonard and Eleanor 
Abe's Fruit Store 

Dubinick and Bespalchick 

Good Will Launderers and Dry Cleaners Inc. 
Paris Lace and Embroidery Works 
Trainer Studio 




Congratulations to . . . 



DANNY PRIMMER 



from 



Aunt Ida and Rhoda 

Mr. and Mrs. Kramer and Family 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Hershkowitz 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wolff 
Mr. and Mrs. Nat Hendler 
Mr. and Mrs. Silverstein 
Saul Friedman 
Yuhan Huber 

Mr. Harold Mohel 

New Atlantic Hotel 
Burnside Manor 
A Friend Jack 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to 



SAUL GANCHROW 



from 




Mom and Dad 

Mendie and Jake 

Aunt Ceil and Uncle Sam 

Aunts Aida and Hannah 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Wohl 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Gnatowsky 
Mr. Al Stern 
Paul 



90 




Congratulations to . 



URIEL GOTTESMAN 



from 



Mom and Dad 
Myron and Aaron 
Grandpa Itzkowitz 
Aunt Zena and Uncle Jules 
Aunt Cynthia and Uncle Fred 
Aunt Belle and Uncle Abe 
Aunt Sylvia and Uncle Bob 
Aunt Yetta and Uncle Philip 



Aunt Ida and Uncle Willie 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Osias 

Mr. Nathan Greenspan 

Mr. Samuel Eliscu 

Mr. Simon Greenspan 

Mr. S. B. Lippman 
Hartford, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Grau 
Forest Hills, N. Y. 




91 




Congratulations to . . . 



OLIVER KLAPPER 




fror 



Mom, Dad, and Bernie 

Aunt Irene and Uncle Ally — Aunt Sarah 

Grandpa Klapper and Grandma Iraelovit 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Last 

Uncle Willie 



Henry Fuchs & Sons Inc. 

94-104 9th Street 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Glenwood Fabrics Corporation 

835 Broadway 

New York, N. Y. 



^ /qi3;> 




Congratulations to 



JOSEPH LIFSCHITZ 



from 



Mr. & Mrs. Hyman Zisfein — Grandparents 

Mr. & Mrs, Harry Ostrow & Family 

Mr. & Mrs. M. J. Golombeck 

Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin Pechman & Family 
Mr. & Mrs. Murray Kotkes 
Mr. & Mrs. Morris Krasna 
Alex Fruchthandler 

Mr. & Mrs. Jack WIeselman & Family 
Henry Krochmal 
and A Friend 



__C1. 






^J^ 



:^5Cr 



N 




93 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 

JACK NESS 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

Mom, Dad, Melvin, and Ronnie 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ness, Gerald, and Leslie 
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Schindler and Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Albert and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Bernstein, Barbara, and Eleanor 
Mr. and Mrs. Murray Waxenfeld, Phyllis, and Gail 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Wechselfeld 




C3> 



94 



J^ 



<<=? 






Congratulations to 



MICHAEL OSTROW 



from 

Mom, Dad, and Bruce 

Aunt Gertrude and Uncle David Goldberg 
Paul and Helen Kwestel 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Bienenfeid 

Mr. & Mrs. Max Marko>vitz 
Ridge Shoe Company 




LriT 



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95 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 




HDD 

n D 3 

D a 
n D 
d n a 

ODD 

HDD 
n n D 
D □ d 
D a 

tl D 

D D D 

D n Q 

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ODD 



MARK PRESS 



Upon His Graduation 



Mom, Dad, Bob & Leon 

Aunt Claire and Uncle Bill 
Sandra and Arnie 

Aunt Kate and Uncle Jack 
Florrie and Roger 
Libby and Harold 

Aunt Mary and Uncle Abe 

Aunt Etta and Uncle Morris 




Aunt Rose and Uncle Hy 

Mrs. Anna Roth 

Aunt Ruth and Uncle Harry 

Aunt Minnie and Vivian 

Aunt Rose, Uncle Rudolph, 
and Herbert 

Jeanette and Mike 



96 



In Memory of 



RABBI JUDAH LEIB ROSE 
MALKA ROSE 
SADIE LEVin 



Mr. & Mrs. H. Press 
Mr. & Mrs. W. Deutsch 
Dr. & Mrs. G. Halperin 
Mr. & Mrs. R. Jacknin 
Mr. & Mrs. H. Krohnengold 
Rabbi & Mrs. A. Rose 



Rabbi & Mrs. M. Rose 

Mrs. Anna Roth 

Rabbi & Mrs. H. Z. Schectman 

Mrs. M. Sklarsky 

Mr. & Mrs. R. Wechsler 

Mr. H. Wechsler 



L,^ra^U LJLj- 






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Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 

BENYOMEN LEIBEL 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

Mr. & Mrs. Abraham Reiss 
Mr. & Mrs. Harry Shekter 
Herman Schweiger 
Morris Rahman 

Fur Merchants Cold Storage Corp. 
Isaac A. Schoen & Sons Inc. 
Harjay Holding Co. 
A Friend 



98 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to 



JACOB TESLER 



from 

Mom & Dad 

Aunt Dorothy, Uncle Joe & Family 

Aunt Betty, Uncle Sam & Cousin Jackie 
Uncle Martin 

Dr. Jacob A. Cheron 

Mr. Louis Goldfinger 

Dr. Isadore M. Goodman 



Li 



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99 



Congratulations to . . . 



SHELDON WEISER 



Upon His Graduation 



from 



Mother, Father and Sister Yvette 



In Loving Memory of 



MR. MAX SAKOW 



by 



MRS. ROSE SAKOW 



and 



Children: 



WALTER - EVELYN - DIANE 



j^f^^X^ 



101 



Congratulations to . . . 

BERNARD ADLER 

from 

Mom and Dad 

Melvin and Susan 

Grandmother; and Lillie 

Aunt Laura and Uncle Sam 

Aunt Betty; Cousins Bert, Rita, and Alan 
Mr. & Mrs. I. Ochs and Family 

Mr. & Mrs. D. Spira and Family 

Mr. & Mrs. B. Pechman and Family 



In Memory of 



My Beloved Wife 

LEAH 

JOSEPH RUBIN 




102 



Best Wishes to 



ISAAC BLACHOR 

from 
Mom and Dad 



Congratulations to . . 



MORTON KAPLAN 

Upon His Graduation 
from 

Parents, Sister, Aunts, Uncles, Cousins and Friends 
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Kaplan and Natalie 
Mr. and Mrs. I. Grossman 

Mr. and Mrs. P. Wishnefsky 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Shainer 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Schneiderman and Family 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Gang and Maureen 
Mr. and Mrs. G. Millstein 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Motel 







103 





Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 

PHILIP BURSKY 

Upon His Graduation 
from 

Mom and Dad 
Grandma 

Aunt Dottie and Uncle Joey 
Aunt Tillie and Uncle Loe 

Aunt Ruth and Uncle Jack 
Herman and Myron 




Congratulations to 



HERSHEL FARKAS 

from 

Milton, Annette, Israel Meir 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Kleinbord & Family 

Dr. M. Pobiner 

Dr. J. Berkowitz 

Koss & Fox 

Atiorneys-af-Law 




k 



104 





Congratulations to 



JACK FEIN 

from 

Mom, Dad and Harriet 

Sam Feinzeig 

Jacob D. Feinzeig 



Congratulations to . . . 



MARTY HOCHMAN 

from 

Zeida, Rozzy, Aaron end Sarah 

Aunt Sarah, Uncle Phil and Edie 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Silverman 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Knalier 
The Itkin Brothers 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Beck 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Winter 






105 



Congratulations to . . . 



PERRY KRAVIT 

from 

Mother, Larry and Aunt Ethel 
Aunt Ada 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Abeloff 



Congratulations to 



MORTON LEIBOWITZ 

from 



Mom 



Dad 



Zeidi 




Best Wishes to 



JOSH 

from 

Mom, Dad and Shelly 

Mr. and Mrs. Sol Broderson 
Freilach Family 

Schliefer Family 



Congratulations to 



MARVIN 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Liebman 
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Eagle 
Katon Cleaners 

Katz — Stricfly Kosher Meats 
A Friend 




107 



Congratulations to . 



ALLEN MANDEL 

Upon His Graduation 
from 

Mom and Dad 

Rabbi Jacob Roth 
Mrs. Harry Roth 



Congratulations to . . 






ALLEN MANDEL 

Upon His Graduation 
from 

THE GEORGE W. WINGATE HIGH SCHOOL 
Irving Feuer 

Samuel Koltun and Emanuel Zamore 
Mr. and Mrs. Spincus 

The Schaovitz Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Horry Rosenblatt 



Jf^ 

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Congratulations to 



FRED 

from 

Mr. & Mrs. Abraham Nathan 
Wallace & Harvey 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Chamedes 

Mr. &Mrs. Sol Nathan 

Mr. & Mrs. Lester Berlin 
Mr. & Mrs. A. Kahn 
Mr. Louis Edison 



Congratulations to 



MARK 

Upon His Graduation 

from 
UNCLE LARRY 




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'<XJ} 



109 




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Congratulations to 



URIEL GOTTESMAN 

from 
I. SHALOM AND CO. INC. 

411 FIFTH AVENUE 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

HANDKERCHIEFS 



Congratulations to 



JOEL 

from 

Mr. & Mrs. I. Tager 

Isaac & Milton Feller & Family 
Shep Goldberg 

Michael Tager & Family 
and A Friend 



Congratulations to . . . 

JACK FEIN 

from 

FEINZEIG WOOL STOCK COMPANY 

155-13 STREET 

BROOKLYN 15, N. Y. 

TEL.: STerling 8-6574 



Congratulations to 



IRA 

on his Graduation 

from 

Mother, Father, and Martin 
Neil Leiblich 

FLAUM'S APPETIZING STORE 

40 LEE AVENUE 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

and a friend 



Congratulations to 



WILLIAM GOLUB 

from 

Mother and Father 

Grandmother and Grandfather 

Usher and Charlotte 

Alan Leslie and Nancy Eileen 



Comp/iments of 



two very good friends of 



MR. WILLIAM KLAPPER 






V^ J <^ 



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111 



Congratulations to . . . 



MARTY LEBOWITZ 



from 



Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Lebowitz 



and family 



Congrotu/otions to . . . 



our Grandson 



MOISHE 



from 



Mr. and Mrs. Hersch Zauderer 



Congratu/afions to 



STAN SUSSMAN 



from 



Mom, Dad, Walt and Danny 



Dr. Abraham Weber 



Congratu/at/ons to . . . 

MORRIS ZAUDERER 

from 

THE MULTEX COMPANY 

Originators of Lockstitch Elastic Shirring 
135 NORTH 11 STREET 
BROOKLYN 11, N. Y. 






^Wtt" %% 



Compliments of 



MR. O. DECKER 



45-34 COURT STREET 



LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 



Compliments of , 



MR. and MRS. HARRY SILVER 



and FAMILY 



Compliments of . 



MR. and MRS. FROST 



and FAMILY 



Compliments of . . 



MR. and MRS. MAX SHREIBER 



and FAMILY 




^~L/Lpu_P Lru 



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Compliments of 



MR. and MRS. LESTER LEVEY 



ABRAHAM PHILLIPS & SONS, INC. 

44 East Broadway 
New York 2, N. Y. 

CA 6-7707 



Compliments of 



MANHATTAN EGG CO. INC. 

349 Greenwich Street 
New York 30, N. Y. 



Compliments of , 



MORRIS J. GOLONBECK INC. 

960 Franklin Avenue 
Brooklyn 25, New York 



K & O BAKERY INC. 

892-896 Bergen Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Congratulations to . . . 

MYRON ZINAMAN 

from 

NATHAN OBEDIN 
LION MACHINE CORPORATION 

1 50 Lafayette Street 
New York 13, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

HOROWITZ-MARGARETEN 

The Best for Passover Goods 



Congratulations to . . . 

HARVEY MANDEL 

from 

Mom, Dad, Grandparents, and Renee 



Congratulations to .. . 

HERSHEL FARKAS 

from 

First Federal Realty Co., Inc. 

713-71 Street 
Miami Beach, Florida 

Harry Licht 



Congratulations to . . . 

OLIVER KLAPPER 

from 

Asher and Boretz Inc. 



Compliments of . , . 



ARISTOCRATS 



The Resnikoff Family Circle 

Congratulates 

ISAAC BLACHOR 



Upon His Graduation 



In Memory of our 
beloved husband and father 

Farkas Family 



LEONARD HAIMES CO., INC. 

35 Mercer Street 
New York 13, N. Y. 

Sokery, Kitchen and Hospital Equipment 



|p«;'*^y^ / 



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Compliments of . . . 

LINCOLN WINES AND LIQUORS 

407 Tompkins Avenue 
Brooklyn 16, N. Y. 

J. Herschmann and S. Kornbluth, Prop. 



Complimenfs of . . . 

MR. and MRS. NATHAN GROSSBARD 

514 Montgomery Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Congrotu/ot/ons fo . . . 

HENRY LERNER 

from 

Father, Mother, Bialik and Cecile 



Congrofu/of/ons to . . . 

MORTY LEIBOWITZ 

JACK NESS 

and 

MOISH ZAUDERER 

from 

Camp Machanaim 



Congrafulafions io . . . 

MORTON KAPLAN 

from 

Grandfather and Grandmother 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Cohen 



Congrafulafions fo . . . 

HARVEY KURITZKY 

from 
Mom, Dad, David and Irene 



Congratulations to 



JACK NESS 



from 



Irving Forman — Insurance Broker 

1 14-38 Farmers Boulevard 
St. Albans, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

MAPLE LAKE CAMP 

Livingston Manor, N. Y. 

N. Y. Office: 1549 - 47 Street 

Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 

Tel.: GE 8-6544 




Congratulations to . . . 

MARK PRESS 

from 
Robert Fields 



Compliments of . . . 

SAM SAPERSTEIN 

Painter & Decorator 
Hy 6-7278 



Congratulations to . . . 

MYRON ZINAMAN 

from 

Standwear Pleating Company 

47-28 37th Street 
Long Island City, N. Y. 




ofBARTON'J^L^^. 



Compliments 
FAMOUS FOR CONTINENTAL 
CHOCOLATES 



Compliments of 



MR. and MRS. LEWIS E. WALTER 



Congro/ulot/ons fo . . . 

MYRON ZINAMAN 

from 

Countess Layne 

152 Madison Avenue 
New York, N. Y. 



Congrotu/afions to . . . 

URIEL GOHESMAN 

from 

Your Brothers 
Myron and Aaron 



In Memory of 

MR. BENJAMIN PRAGER 



MR. B. ISAACS 
Star Webbing Company, Inc. 

487 Broadway 
New York 3, N. Y. 








13 I — I D D 



/ 



117 



EV 4-8908 

HARRY LEADER'S FRUIT & VEGETABLE STORE 

791 FLUSHING AVENUE BROOKLYN 1, N. Y. 



Compliments of . 



MRS. S. DAUERMAN 



Compliments of . 



DR. SAMUEL LEFKOW 

Chiropodist-Podiatrist 

212 EAST BROADWAY 

Tel.: OR 4-1909 



Congratulations to . 



SIMEON HOOK 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. Israel Blau 



Compliments of . . . 

ATLANTIC YEAST CO. 

640 DEAN STREET BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Complimenis of . . . 

JACK'S QUALITY FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

1 306 - 50 STREET BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Tel.: GE 5-5333 

Congratulations to . . . 

MORRIS ZAUDERER 

from 

LINCOLN WINES & LIQUORS 

407 TOMPKINS AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

RUBIN CHEMISTS 

540 EASTERN PARKWAY BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

H. L. CASSEL 

1186 BROADWAY NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

A. L. LIEBMAN & SON INC. 

2046 MacDONALD AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Comp/imenfj of . . . 

THE BORO PARK AND FLATBUSH C.P.'s 



Compliments of . . . 

ACME BRAND SALES CO. 

139-141 SPRING STREET 



Compliments of . . . 

CUTOLO REALTY AND INSURANCE 

7407-lOlsf AVENUE OZONE PARK 16, N. Y. 



Compf/menfs of . . . 

ROSLYN, MONROE, and SIMON BRAUN 



In Memory of . 



ESTHER FRIEDFELD SALTZ 



HY 3-7005 

RUGBY FUEL CORP. 

932 UTICA AVENUE BROOKLYN 3, N. Y. 




Compliments of . . . 

FLAUM and MASS APPETIZERS 

127 LEE AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. and MRS. HARRY PALITZ 



Congratulations fo . 



MYRON ZINAMAN 



Mr. & Mrs. Henry Cooperman 



Compliments of . . . 

NOBLE DRUGS 

411 KINGSTON AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

PR 2-4212 



Congratulations to . 



HENRY LERNER 



fron 



Amrose Radio & T.V. Store 

1061 FLATBUSH AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Compliments of . . . 

M. H. GINSBURG 

130 WEST 29th STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Congratulations to . 



HY SAPERSTEIN 



Compliments of . . . 

FALECK and MARGOLIES 

7-11 WEST 45lh STREET NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 



Compliments of . 



GUSTAVE FARB 



BENNY'S BARBER SHOP 

855 BELMONT AVENUE 
BROOKLYN 8, N. Y. 



Compliments of . 



J. PECHMAN & CO. 

Oils and Bakers' Supplies 
MASPETH, L. I. 



In Memory of . 



MR. MAX HOENIG 



Compliments of . , . 

MR. and MRS. MORRIS SCHIENBERG 



Compliments of . . . 

HARRY SELLINGER 
STRONGHOLD FLOUR COMPANY 



Compliments of . . . 

L. and G. KOSHER MEAT MARKET 

2145 KNAPP STREET BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Congratulations to 



MYRON ZINAMAN 

from 

Rabbi & Mrs. Aharon Baskin 




119 



Congrafulations to . . . 

MARTY LEBOWITZ 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. Soffer 



Congraiulations to . . . 

JACK 

from 

Toker Textile Co. 

141 WEST 40fh STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Congrafo/ofionj to . 



MY YOUNG FRIENDS 

HARVEY and IRA 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. and MRS. JACOB KESTENBAUM 



Congratulations to . . . 

MOSES 

from 

Mother, Father, Milty and Joe Geffen 



Congrafu/ations to . . . 

MARK PRESS 

from 

Robert and Jane Kreizman 



Congratulations to . . . 

MARK PRESS 

from 

Fred Barstch and Family 



'•Aa^mX 



Compliments of . . . 

DOVER SEWING MACHINE CO. 

496 KNICKERBOCKER AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 




Compliments of . . . 

M. KREISSEL, S.N. 

Sales Representative 

NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

130 WEST 42nd STREET NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

TREADEASY-RUGBY SHOE SHOP 

5005 CHURCH AVENUE BROOKLYN 3, N. Y. 



Comp/imentj of . . . 

GEM JEWELERS 

2215 AVENUE X BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . 



DR. JACOB FAGELMAN 



Compliments of . . . 

UNEEDA SEWING MACHINE CORP. 

190 WILSON AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



KRAUSHAAR'S GROCERY 

4824 16th AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

CAMEO STATIONERY SHOP 

838 NOSTRAND AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

J & K ELECTRIC TRANSMITTER CO. 

760 SIXTH AVENUE NEW YORK 10, N. Y. 





120 



Compliments of . . . 

MET FOOD STORES 

948 NOSTRAND AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Congratulations to . . . 

MARK 

from 

A. Kaufman and Family 

Congratulations to . . . 

MYRON ZINAMAN 

from 

Oscar Moskowitz 



Compliments of . . . 

CONGREGATION MOGEN ABRAHAM 

437 SCHENCK AVENUE 

A. Zryb, Pres. I. Shurin, Robbi 



Compliments of . . . 

GANELES-LENGER WINE CORP. 

136 LUDLOW STREET NEW YORK CITY 

GR 7-5797 



Congratulations to . 



LARRY GREENFIELD 



fron 



A FRIEND 



Congratulations to our . . . 

NEPHEW LARRY 

Upon His Graduation 
from 

Mr. & Mrs. Anshel Greenfield 



Compliments of . . . 

DUCORS DECORATORS 

432 CENTRAL AVENUE CEDARHURST, L. I., N. Y. 

Tel.: CE 9-2284 



Congratulations to 

SHELDON STEIN 

from 

Ben and Sol — Kosher Caterers 

854 FRANKLIN AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Congrafu/ofions to . . . 

MARK PRESS 

from 

Andrew M. Violette 



Comp/imenfs of . , . 

GOLD and REISS-HARDWARES 



Compliments of . . . 

KAYLISS BAKERY 

4912 -13»h AVENUE BROOKLYN 19, N. Y. 



Comp/(menfs of . . . 

JULIUS WEISSMAN & SON 

Insurance 
412 EAST 94fh STREET BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. and MRS. LOUIS BERMAN 



Compliments of . . . 

DR. D. SIEGELMAN 

1 HANSON PLACE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

HARRY LEVY'S SHOES 

408 SARATOGA AVENUE BROOKLYN 33, N. Y. 




121 




Compliments of . 



ROBIN HOOD 

and 

All His Little Hoods 




PARISIAN CATERERS 

4502 NINTH AVENUE 
Weddings, Bar Mifzvahs, Receptions 



Compliments of . . . 

ABIE'S 

Sfriclly Kosher Meaf and Poultry Market 
541 RALPH AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



A^ 



Complimenfs of . . . 

MR. and MRS. HERMAN MESHENBERG 




Compliments of . . . 

CROWN TINSEL CORP. 

20 EAST 17th STREET NEW YORK 3, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

DR. J. FAGELMAN 

1617 PRESIDENT STREET BROOKLYN, N. Y 



A Friend of the Yeshiva 

MR. and MRS. MAX GORDON 



MINES BROS, and REICHEK, INC. 

Wholesale Furniture 
35 EAST BROADWAY NEW YORK, N. Y. 




Compliments of . . . 



SPERLING FAMILY 



Compliments to my freind . . . 

JACK LEVENBROWN 

from 

Jack Goldman 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. and Mrs. ABRAHAM HOLLINS 

716 AVENUE J BROOKLYN 30, N. Y. 



Compliments of . 



NEHEMIAH PILLER 



CHARLES LIEBOWITZ AND CO., INC. 

Insurance Broker 
116 JOHN STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

MEL GLO BAKERY 

1657 ST. JOHNS PLACE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

APEX UTILITIES INC. 

842 RALPH AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



SCHWARTZ'S SUPERIOR YEAST 

556 EAST 94th STREET BROOKLYN 36, N. Y. 

Dickens 2-2545 



122 





Compliments of . . . 

SCOTT MOTORS 

1642 FLATBUSH AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . 



A FRIEND 



REGENT THREAD COMPANY 

108 EAST 31 si STREET 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

PAVONE BROTHERS 

877 NOSTRAND AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. and MRS. MAX STERN 



Greetings 



CAMP ETON 

RED HOOK, N. Y. 

JACK ABOFF, Director 



Compliments of . . . 

SIMCO MANUFACTURERS JEWELERS 

62 WEST 47fh STREET NEW YORK 36, N, Y. 



Compliments of . . 

MR. O. DECKER 

New York Manager, J. L. Thomson MFC 
Tubular and Split Rivets 



Compliments of . 



T. A. MINYEN 



Congra/u/af(ons fo ffie . . . 

GRADUATING CLASS OF JUNE 1957 

STAN ROSENFELD 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. and MRS. H. BINDLER 



Compliments of . 



BERSAK DRESS CO. 

NEW YORK 18, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

MORRIS KATZENSTEIN 

23 SPRUCE STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

MARCY BINDERY 

170 A^ARCY AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Complimenfs of . . . 

G. & W. SPORTSWEAR, INC. 

Knitted Outerwear 
146 WEST 28th STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. 



SHELDON WEISER 



Mr. and Mrs. Marcus Segal and Family 






123 



ANN ADAMS KNITWEAR, INC. 

1384 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 18, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

F & G EXPORT COMPANY 

641 MONTGOMERY STREET BROOKLYN 25, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

JACK'S HYGRADE MEAT MARKET 

5017- 13th AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



CRATER FUEL CORP. 

426 PRESIDENT STREET BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Fuel Oil and Coal 



IMPERIAL BAG AND PAPER CO. INC. 

620 TIFFANY STREET BRONX, N. Y. 

Kl 2-1100 



LEON POLLACK 

Licensed Plumber 

Sleam and Hot Water Heating 

200 WEST 146th STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

FRANKEL and LASHER FAMILIES 



Compliments of . . . 

MAUZONE HOME PRODUCTS INC. 

427 KINGSTON AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



BERKLEY GARAGE 

201-205 WEST 7Sth STREET NEW YORK 23, N. Y. 

TR 4-0581 



Compliments of . . . 

JAMES, BARBARA, and KAREN LEHMAN 



Compliments of . . . 

CUSTOM CASE COMPANY 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

LEBOWITZ PINE VIEW HOTEL 



Congrotulofic 



MEL GALUN 

Upon His Groduatior 
from 

Mom and Dad 



Compliments of . . . 

BARNEY and MITCH HABERDASHERY 

56 BRISTOL STREET BROOKLYN 12, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

ISADORE SHIMANSKY 

Soturdoy Observed Boltery 
502 EAST 95th STREET BROOKLYN 12, N. Y. 

Compliments of . . . 

EXCELLED SHEEPSKIN & LEATHER 
COAT COMPANY 

832 BROADWAY NEW YORK, N. Y. 



rrn 



124 



^t^bOfi 




Congratulations to . , . 

LARRY 

Upon HisGraduotion 

Mrs. B. Greenfield, Judy and Ruthie 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. and MRS. ARTHUR SCHAPIRA 
and ELAINE 



IZZY'S FRUIT STORE 

365 EAST 98th STREET 
BROOKLYN, N Y. 



In Memory of Our Beloved 

Mother and Grondmothe 

MRS. B. ARCUS 



Compliments of . . . 

UNITY SEWING MACHINE COMPANY 

50 WEST 25lh STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. 



LOUIS HACKMEYER 

F/our Jobber 
179 ESSEX STREET NEW YORK 7, N. Y. 



Congrotu/otions to Our Son 

ALAN 

Upon His Graduation 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Hyman 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to 

AARON 

From . . . 

His Parents and 
Brothers Howard, Irving and Lazar 



In Memory of , 



My Beloved Husband 

PHILIP LITSKY 



Congrofu/otions to . 



MOSES GEFFEN 



Mr. and Mrs. H. Berkowitz and Son 

Compliments of . . . 

MR. and MRS. SIGMUND N. EPSTEIN 
and FAMILY 

Newark, New Jersey 



Compliments of . . . 

SCOTT'S FABRIC MART 

42 MERRICK AVENUE MERRICK, LONG ISLAND 



Congratulations to Our Son 

SHELDON 

Upon His Graduation 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Stein 

Compliments of .. . 

BIALYSTOCKER BAKERY 

"Best WIren Toasted" 
4714 -16th AVENUE BROOKLYN 19, N. Y. 



JOE FRIED- DRUGS 

336 UTICA AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

PR 8-3400 We Deliver 




125 



COMPLIMENTARY ADS 




I. Goldberg 

Zwail's Fish Market 

Key Food Store 

Food King Super Market Corporation 

Schneck Arch Support Company 

Mr. and Mrs. Saul I. Greenfield 

Pearl Rosenberg 

Henry's Department Store 

Max Selig 

David Moskowitz 

Family Ostrega 

Diamond's Pharmacy 

Dr. and Mrs. Harry Chodroff 

Dr. and Mrs. George L. Ingber 

Mason's Hardware & Housefurnishings 

Mr. and Mrs. Frost and Family 

A Friend 

Dr. William B. Groisser 

H & J Cleaners 




Mr. and Mrs. I. Levine 

Levine Brothers Butchers 

Blake Laundry & Cleaners 

Glor-Eve Beauty Salon 

New Brighton Jewish Center 

Rabbi and Mrs. Baum 

Charles Drooks 

Schlagers Kosher Meat & Poultry Market 

Jack Steinberg's Kosher Meat & Poultry 

A Friend 

Associated Uniform Company 

Casa Cameo Service Station inc. 

Manosseh Kamen, M.D. 

Julie's Cut Rate Shoes 

George Levy's Food Store 

Mr. and Mrs. Sater 

Rutland Packing Company 

Mr. Meyer Kuller 

Morris Waldman 



126 




I 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 

BERNARD ADLER. 846 - 46 Street 

ALAN BALSAM, 101-18 - 94 Street, Ozone Park 

ISAAC BLACHOR, 748 St. Marks Avenue 

PHILIP BURSKY, 1446 - 52 Street 

JOSEPH DAINA, Fort Dix, N. J 

HERSHELFARKAS, 1438 E. 17 Street 

JACK FEIN, 1319 - 51 Street 

AZRIEL FEINER, 9720 Kings Highway 

NATHAN FINKIEL, 325 Legion Street 

PHILIP FRIEDMAN, 32 Bristol Street 

DANIEL FRIMMER, 868 - 50 Street 

AARON FRUCHTER, 1126-51 Street 

MELVIN GALUN, 497 Snediker Avenue 

SAUL GANCHOW, 239 Remsen Avenue 

MOSES GEFFEN. 641 Montgomery Street 

WILLIAM GOLUB, 568 Bristol Street 

URIEL GOTTESMAN, Greystone Hotel, 91 St. & Broadway, N. Y. C. 

LAWRENCE GREENFIELD, 1450 - 49 Street 

STEPHEN GROSSBARD, 514 Montgomery Street 

MARTIN HOCHMAN, 193 Albany Avenue 

ALAN HYMAN, 225 West 86 Street 

MORTON KAPLAN, 1417 - 53 Street 

IRA KELLMAN, 1035 Washington Avenue 

OLIVER KLAPPER, 533 East 2 Street 

PERRY KRAVIT, 198 Wilson Avenue 

ARNOLD KREGER, 954 Nostrand Avenue 

HARVEY KURITZKY, 1576 - 49 Street 

MARTIN LEBOWITZ, 1266 - 45 Street 

MORTON LEIBOWITZ, 386 East 46 Street 

HENRY LERNER, 128 East 94 Street 

JOSHUA LEVY, 926 - 47 Street 

MARVIN LIEBMAN, 2263 East 29 Street 

JOSEPH LIFSCHITZ, 377 Montgomery Street 

ALLEN MANDEL. 1757-51 Street 

HARVEY MANDEL, 4611 - 12 Avenue 

FREDERICK NATHAN, 1414-45 Street 

JACK NESS, 440 Lenox Road 

MICHAEL OSTROW. 4915 - 15 Avenue 

MARK PRESS, 1472 - 53 Street 

BENYOMEN REISS, 637 Montgomery Street 

HYMAN SAPERSTEIN, 457 Georgia Avenue 

SHELDON STEIN, 559 Jerome Street 

STANLEY SUSSMAN. 191 Heyward Street 

JOEL TAGER. 325 Grafton Street 

JACOB TESSLER, 191 Penn Street 

SHELDON WEISER, 2218 - 78 Street 

MORRIS ZAUDERER. 410 Crown Street 

MYRON ZINAMAN, 58-38 - 203 Street, Bayside 




127 



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